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Paul Henderson

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Paul Henderson
Paulhenderson
Position Left Wing
Shoots Right
Height
Weight
5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
180 lb (82 kg)
Teams Detroit Red Wings
Toronto Maple Leafs
Atlanta Flames
Birmingham Bulls
Toronto Toros
Nationality Flag of Canada Canadian
Born January 28,1943,
Kincardine, Ontario
Pro Career 1960 – 1981


Paul Henderson (born January 28, 1943 in Kincardine, Ontario, Canada) is a retired Canadian left winger who played 13 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Detroit Red Wings, Toronto Maple Leafs and Atlanta Flames. He is best known for scoring the winning goal against the USSR in game eight of the 1972 Summit Series.

Paul Henderson presently works in various ministries affiliated with Campus Crusade for Christ.

Playing careerEdit

Henderson played left wing in various professional leagues in North America, as well as for Team Canada in international competitions. Henderson is best known for scoring hockey's most famous goal (a.k.a. the Goal of the Century), helping Team Canada clinch the 1972 Summit Series against the Soviet Union in the dying seconds of the final game.


Paul Henderson played his junior career with the Hamilton Red Wings of the OHA from 1960 to 1963. He would help lead Hamilton to the Memorial Cup title in 1962.

Henderson played 13 seasons in the NHL. He began his career in 1962 with the Detroit Red Wings, staying there until 1968 (with the exception of the 1963 season, when he played for the Pittsburgh Hornets of the AHL). He was traded by Detroit with Norm Ullman and Floyd Smith to the Toronto Maple Leafs for Frank Mahovlich, Garry Unger, Pete Stemkowski and the contract rights to Carl Brewer on March 3, 1968.

He was among the NHL players selected to compete against the USSR in the 1972 Summit Series. He became famous in Canada after scoring the winning goals in the final three games of the eight-game series, securing the Canadian victory. He also played for Canada in the 1974 Summit Series in which Canadian WHA players were pitted against the Soviet team.

In 1974 Henderson left the Maple Leafs and the NHL altogether, jumping to the rival WHA where he played for the Toronto Toros. He remained with the Toros franchise after its relocation to Birmingham, Alabama and re-named the Birmingham Bulls. He stayed with the team when it transferred to the CHL in 1979.

He returned to the NHL in 1980 for one final season, playing for the Atlanta Flames. The following season he returned to the CHL's Birmingham Bulls and retired in 1981.

HHOF DebateEdit

Henderson has not been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, and there is much debate over his omission. He scored one of the most famous goals in Hockey and Canadian sports history when he scored the winning goal in the deciding game eight of the 1972 Summit Series between Canada and the Soviet Union. If Henderson was inducted, it would be due almost entirely to the historical significance of that goal (plus his game-winners in games six and seven as well). Although his NHL numbers were respectable (236 goals and 477 points in 707 career NHL games), they are not close to the levels of those generally selected for induction. His candidacy has led to many debates among hockey fans, because although his performance in the Summit Series made him one of the most well known names in hockey, many fans feel that it is not right to honour a player's entire career because of one highlight. It is important to note that it is the Hockey Hall of Fame, not the NHL Hall of Fame.

During a press conference on the 30th anniversary celebrations of the series in 2002, Henderson criticized former linemate Bobby Clarke for his slash on Valery Kharlamov's ankle, which neutralized the Soviet star for the rest of the series, dubbing the move "the lowpoint of the series". Clarke responded that Henderson had made his career entirely on the historical significance the series-winning goal, and that Henderson would have remained an unknown if he did not score these goals. Clarke went on to say "I think it's improper to criticize a teammate 30 years later. If it was so offensive, why didn't he bother to say something after the game?" Henderson has since retracted his criticism.

AwardsEdit

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RecordsEdit

Career statistics Edit

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1960–61 Hamilton OHA Jr. A 30 1 3 4 9 12 1 1 2 4
1961–62 Hamilton OHA Jr. A 50 24 19 43 68 10 4 6 10 13
1962–63 Hamilton OHA Jr. A 48 49 27 76 53 3 2 0 2 0
1962–63 Detroit Red Wings NHL 2 0 0 0 9 -- -- -- -- --
1963–64 Pittsburgh Hornets AHL 38 10 14 24 18 -- -- -- -- --
1963–64 Detroit Red Wings NHL 32 3 3 6 14 14 2 3 5 6
1964–65 Detroit Red Wings NHL 70 8 13 21 30 7 0 2 2 0
1965–66 Detroit Red Wings NHL 69 22 24 46 34 12 3 3 6 10
1966–67 Detroit Red Wings NHL 46 21 19 40 10 -- -- -- -- --
1967–68 Detroit Red Wings NHL 50 13 20 33 35 -- -- -- -- --
1967–68 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 13 5 6 11 8 -- -- -- -- --
1968–69 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 74 27 32 59 16 4 0 1 1 0
1969–70 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 67 20 22 42 18 -- -- -- -- --
1970–71 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 72 30 30 60 34 6 5 1 6 4
1971–72 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 73 38 19 57 32 5 1 2 3 6
1972–73 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 40 18 16 34 18 -- -- -- -- --
1973–74 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 69 24 31 55 40 4 0 2 2 2
1974–75 Toronto Toros WHA 58 30 33 63 18 -- -- -- -- --
1975–76 Toronto Toros WHA 65 26 29 55 22 -- -- -- -- --
1976–77 Birmingham Bulls WHA 81 23 25 48 30 -- -- -- -- --
1977–78 Birmingham Bulls WHA 80 37 29 66 22 5 1 1 2 0
1978–79 Birmingham Bulls WHA 76 24 27 51 20 -- -- -- -- --
1979–80 Birmingham Bulls CHL 47 17 18 35 10 -- -- -- -- --
1979–80 Atlanta Flames NHL 30 7 6 13 6 4 0 0 0 0
1980–81 Birmingham Bulls CHL 35 6 11 17 38 -- -- -- -- --
NHL totals 707 236 241 477 304 56 11 14 25 28
WHA totals 360 140 143 283 112 5 1 1 2 0

International playEdit

  • Played for Team Canada in the 1972 Summit Series.
  • Played for Team Canada in the 1974 Summit Series.
  • One of three players to have played for Team Canada both Summit Series. The other two were Pat Stapleton and Frank Mahovlich.

International statistics

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
1972 Canada Summit 8 7 3 10 4
1974 Canada Summit 7 2 1 3 0
This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Paul Henderson. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Ice Hockey Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0 (Unported) (CC-BY-SA).


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