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Minnesota Golden Gophers men's ice hockey seasons

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This is a list of seasons completed by the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers men's ice hockey team. The list documents the season-by-season records of the Golden Gophers from 1921 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

Minnesota has won five NCAA Men's Division I Ice Hockey Championships (1974, 1976, 1979, 2002, 2003) and been the runner-up six times (1953, 1954, 1971, 1975, 1981, 1989). The team also shared the 1929 National Intercollegiate Athletic Association championship with Yale and won the 1940 AAU-sponsored national championship for amateur hockey. In their 89-year history, they have played over 2650 games and have an all-time winning percentage of .630. The Gophers have made thirty-two NCAA postseason appearances since tournament play began in 1948. Their nineteen Frozen Four appearances are bettered by three teams: the University of Michigan (twenty-three), Boston University (twenty-one), and Boston College (twenty-one). Minnesota is also one of only four teams to win consecutive national titles (the others being Boston University, Denver University, and the University of Michigan). The Golden Gophers have been named the WCHA's regular season champion twelve times and its tournament champion fourteen times.

  • The Wins, Losses, and Ties columns list regular season and postseason results.
AAU Champions (1931–1948) NCAA D-I Champions (1948–present) NCAA Frozen Four (1948–present) Conference Regular Season Champions Conference Playoff Champions
Season League Conference Overall Record[1] National Tournament Results Awards[2]
Regular
Season
Finish
GP W L T
I.D. MacDonald (1921 — 1922)
1921–22 10 6 3 1
Emil Iverson (1922 — 1930)
1922–23 12 10 1 1
1923–24 14 13 1 0
1924–25 10 8 1 1
1925–26 16 12 0 4
1926–27 15 9 6 0
1927–28 13 9 2 2
1928–29 17 14 2 1
1929–30 18 7 9 2
Frank Pond (1930 — 1935)
1930–31 19 7 11 1
1931–32 16 12 3 1
1932–33 11 10 1 0
1933–34 14 11 3 0
1934–35 14 6 6 2
Larry Armstrong (1935 — 1947)
1935–36 16 10 6 0
1936–37 16 11 4 1
1937–38 17 7 9 1
1938–39 23 17 6 0 Won in AAU Quarterfinals, 10–1 (Philadelphia)
Won in AAU Semifinals, 3–2 (St. Nicholas)
Lost in AAU Championship, 3–4 (Cleveland)
1939–40 18 18 0 0 Won in AAU Semifinals, 9–4 (Amesbury)
Won AAU Championship, 9–1 (Brock Hall)
John Mariucci (All-American)[3]
Harold Paulsen (All-American)
1940–41 16 11 3 2
1941–42 12 7 5 0
1942–43 16 10 5 1
1943–44 11 6 5 0
1944–45 10 7 2 1
1945–46 14 9 4 1
1946–47 20 12 5 3
Doc Romnes (1947 — 1952)
1947–48 NCAA 21 9 12 0
1948–49 NCAA 23 12 11 0
1949–50 NCAA 16 5 11 0
1950–51 NCAA 26 14 12 0 Gordon Watters (All-American)
1951–52 NCAA MCHL[4] 5th 26 13 13 0 Lawrence Ross (All-American)
John Mariucci (1952 — 1955)
1952–53 NCAA MCHL 1st 29 23 6 0 Won in NCAA Semifinals, 3–2 (Rensselaer)
Lost in NCAA D-I Championship, 3–7 (Michigan)
John Mariucci (COTY)[5]
1953–54 NCAA WIHL[6] T-1st 30 23 6 1 Won in NCAA Semifinals, 14–1 (Boston College)
Lost in NCAA D-I Championship, 4–5 (OT) (Rensselaer)
Richard Dougherty (All-American)
James Mattson (All-American)
John Mayasich (All-American)
Ken Yackel, Sr. (All-American)
1954–55 NCAA WIHL 3rd 30 16 12 2 John Mayasich (All-American)
Marsh Ryman (1955 — 1956)[7]
1955–56 NCAA WIHL 4th 29 16 12 1
John Mariucci (1956 — 1966)
1956–57 NCAA WIHL 6th 29 12 15 2
1957–58 NCAA WIHL 4th 27 16 11 0 Richard Burg (All-American)
Jack McCartan (All-American)
1958–59 NCAA [8] 24 12 10 2 Murray Williamson (All-American)
Big Ten [9] 2nd 8 4 3 1
1959–60 NCAA WCHA 6th 27 9 16 2
Big Ten 1st 8 5 3 0
1960–61 NCAA WCHA 2nd 29 17 11 1 Lost in NCAA Semifinals, 1–6 (Denver)
Won NCAA Third Place, 4–3 (Rensselaer)
Big Ten 2nd 8 5 3 0
1961–62 NCAA WCHA 6th 21 9 10 2
Big Ten 3rd 4 0 3 1
1962–63 NCAA WCHA 4th 27 16 7 4 Lou Nanne (All-American, WCHA MVP)[10]
Big Ten 1st 8 5 1 2
1963–64 NCAA WCHA 3rd 25 14 11 0 Craig Falkman (All-American)
Big Ten 2nd 8 5 3 0
1964–65 NCAA WCHA 3rd 28 14 12 2 Doug Woog (All-American)
Big Ten 1st 8 5 3 0
1965–66 NCAA WCHA T-2nd 27 16 11 0 Gary Gambucci (WCHA ROTY)[11]
Big Ten 1st 8 5 3 0
Glen Sonmor (1966 — 1971)
1966–67 NCAA WCHA 8th 29 9 19 1
Big Ten 3rd 8 2 5 1
1967–68 NCAA WCHA 5th 31 19 12 0 Gary Gambucci (All-American)
Murray McLachlan (WCHA ROTY)
Big Ten 2nd 8 3 5 0
1968–69 NCAA WCHA 5th 29 13 13 3 Murray McLachlan(All-American, WCHA MVP)
Big Ten 4th 10 4 5 1
1969–70 NCAA WCHA 1st 33 21 12 0 Murray McLachlan (All-American, WCHA MVP)
Wally Olds (All-American)
Glen Sonmor (WCHA COTY)
Big Ten 1st 12 8 4 0
1970–71 NCAA WCHA 5th 33 14 17 2 Won in NCAA Semifinals, 6–5 (Harvard)
Lost in NCAA D-I Championship, 2–4 (Boston University)
Big Ten 3rd 10 5 5 0
Glen Sonmor / Ken Yackel, Sr. (1971 — 1972)[12]
1971–72 NCAA WCHA 10th 32 8 24 0
Big Ten 4th 10 4 6 0
Herb Brooks (1972 — 1979)
1972–73 NCAA WCHA 6th 34 15 16 3
Big Ten 3rd 12 5 5 2
1973–74 NCAA WCHA 2nd 39 22 11 6 Won in NCAA Semifinals, 5–4 (Boston University)
Won NCAA D-I Championship (1), 4–2 (Michigan Tech)
Herb Brooks (WCHA COTY)
Big Ten T-1st 12 5 4 3
1974–75 NCAA WCHA 1st 42 31 10 1 Won in NCAA Semifinals, 6–4 (Harvard)
Lost in NCAA D-I Championship, 1–6 (Michigan Tech)
Les Auge (All-American)
Mike Polich (All-American, WCHA MVP)
Big Ten 1st 12 8 4 0
1975–76 NCAA WCHA 3rd 44 28 14 2 Won in NCAA Semifinals, 4–2 (Boston University)
Won NCAA D-I Championship (2), 6–4 (Michigan Tech)
Big Ten 3rd 12 4 8 0
1976–77 NCAA WCHA 7th 41 17 21 3
Big Ten 3rd 12 5 7 0
1977–78 NCAA WCHA 4th 38 22 14 2
Big Ten 3rd 12 6 6 0
1978–79 NCAA WCHA 2nd 44 32 11 1 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 3–6 (Bowling Green)
Won in NCAA Semifinals, 4–3 (New Hampshire)
Won NCAA D-I Championship (3), 4–3 (North Dakota)
William Baker (All-American)
Big Ten 1st 12 10 2 0
Brad Buetow (1979 — 1985)
1979–80 NCAA WCHA 2nd 41 26 15 0 Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 3–4 (Northern Michigan) Tim Harrer (All-American, WCHA MVP)
Brad Buetow (WCHA COTY)
Aaron Broten (WCHA FOTY)[11]
Big Ten 1st 12 8 4 0
1980–81 NCAA WCHA 1st 45 33 12 0 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 9–4, 5–4 (Colgate)
Won in NCAA Semifinals, 7–2 (Michigan Tech)
Lost in NCAA D-I Championship, 3–6 (Wisconsin)
Neal Broten (Hobey Baker, All-American)
Steven Ulseth (All-American, WCHA MVP)
Big Ten 1st 12 11 1 0
1981–82 NCAA WCHA 3rd 36 22 12 2
1982–83 NCAA WCHA 1st 45 32 12 1 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 9–6, 7–2 (New Hampshire)
Lost in NCAA Semifinals, 3–5 (Harvard)
Lost in NCAA Third Place, 3–4 (Providence)
1983–84 NCAA WCHA 3rd 40 27 11 2
1984–85 NCAA WCHA 2nd[13] 47 31 13 3 Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 7–5, 1–4, (Boston College) Pat Micheletti (All-American)
Doug Woog (1985 — 1999)[14]
1985–86 NCAA WCHA 2nd 48 35 13 0 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 6–4, 5–3 (Boston University)
Lost in NCAA Semifinals, 4–6 (Michigan State)
Won NCAA Third Place, 6–4 (Denver)
1986–87 NCAA WCHA 2nd 49 34 14 1 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 4–1, 2–3 (Boston College)
Lost in NCAA Semifinals, 3–5 (Michigan State)
Won NCAA Third Place, 6–3 (Harvard)
1987–88 NCAA WCHA 1st 44 34 10 0 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 4–2, 4–3 (Michigan State)
Lost in NCAA Semifinals, 2–3 (St. Lawrence)
Lost in NCAA Third Place, 2–5 (Maine)
Robb Stauber (Hobey Baker, All-American, WCHA MVP, WCHA GOTY)[15]
1988–89 NCAA WCHA 1st 48 34 11 3 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 4–2, 4–2 (Wisconsin)
Won in NCAA Semifinals, 7–4 (Maine)
Lost in NCAA D-I Championship, 3–4 (OT) (Harvard)
Robb Stauber (WCHA GOTY)
1989–90 NCAA WCHA 2nd 46 28 16 2 Won in NCAA First Round, 6–1, 5–1 (Clarkson)
Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 2–4, 2–1, 1–6 (Boston College)
Doug Woog (WCHA COTY)
1990–91 NCAA WCHA 2nd 45 30 10 5 Won in NCAA First Round, 3–4, 8–4, 8–3 (Providence)
Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 0–4, 3–5 (Maine)
1991–92 NCAA WCHA 1st 44 33 11 0 Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 3–8 (Lake Superior St.) Darby Hendrickson (WCHA ROTY)[11]
1992–93 NCAA WCHA T-2nd 42 22 12 8 Won in NCAA First Round, 2–1 (Clarkson)
Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 2–6 (Maine)
1993–94 NCAA WCHA 2nd 42 25 13 4 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 2–1 (2OT) (UMass-Lowell)
Lost in NCAA Semifinals, 1–4 (Boston University)
1994–95 NCAA WCHA 4th 44 25 14 5 Won in NCAA First Round, 3–0 (Rensselaer)
Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 5–2 (Colorado College)
Lost in NCAA Semifinals, 3–7 (Boston University)
Brian Bonin (All-American, WCHA POTY)[10]
Mike Crowley (WCHA ROTY)
1995–96 NCAA WCHA 2nd 42 30 10 2 Won in NCAA First Round, 5–1 (Providence)
Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 3–4 (Michigan)
Brian Bonin (Hobey Baker, All-American, WCHA POTY)
Mike Crowley (All-American)
1996–97 NCAA WCHA T-1st 42 28 13 1 Won in NCAA First Round, 6–3 (Michigan State)
Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 4–7 (Michigan)
Mike Crowley (All-American, WCHA POTY)
1997–98 NCAA WCHA 6th 39 17 22 0
1998–99 NCAA WCHA 5th 43 15 19 9
Don Lucia (1999 — present)
1999–00 NCAA WCHA 6th 41 20 19 2
2000–01 NCAA WCHA 3rd 42 27 13 2 Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 4–5 (OT) (Maine) Jordan Leopold (WCHA DPOTY)
2001–02 NCAA WCHA 3rd 44 32 8 4 Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 4–2 (Colorado College)
Won in NCAA Semifinals, 3–2 (Michigan)
Won NCAA D-I Championship (4), 4–3 (OT) (Maine)
Jordan Leopold (Hobey Baker, All-American, WCHA DPOTY)
John Pohl (All-American)
2002–03 NCAA WCHA T-2nd 45 28 8 9 Won in NCAA First Round, 9–2 (Mercyhurst)
Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 7–4 (Ferris State)
Won in NCAA Semifinals, 3–2 (OT) (Michigan)
Won NCAA D-I Championship (5), 5–1 (New Hampshire)
Thomas Vanek (WCHA ROTY)
2003–04 NCAA WCHA T-4th 44 27 14 3 Won in NCAA First Round, 5–2 (Notre Dame)
Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 1–3 (Minnesota-Duluth)
Keith Ballard (All-American)
2004–05 NCAA WCHA T-3rd 44 28 15 1 Won in NCAA First Round, 1–0 (OT) (Maine)
Won in NCAA Quarterfinals, 2–1 (OT) (Cornell)
Lost in NCAA Semifinals, 2–4 (North Dakota)
2005–06 NCAA WCHA 1st 41 27 9 5 Lost in NCAA First Round, 3–4 (OT) (Holy Cross) Ryan Potulny (All-American)
Phil Kessel (WCHA ROTY)
Don Lucia (WCHA COTY)
2006–07 NCAA WCHA 1st 44 31 10 3 Won in NCAA First Round, 4–3 (Air Force)
Lost in NCAA Quarterfinals, 2–3 (OT) (North Dakota)
Alex Goligoski (All-American, WCHA DPOTY)
2007–08 NCAA WCHA 7th 45 19 17 9 Lost in NCAA First Round, 2–5 (Boston College)
2008–09 NCAA WCHA 5th 37 17 13 7 Ryan Stoa (All-American)
Jordan Schroeder (WCHA ROTY)
2009–10 NCAA WCHA 7th 37 18 19 2
Totals 2689 1611 914 164 (includes regular season and postseason results); 5 NCAA Division I Championships

FootnotesEdit

  1. Code explanation; GP—Games Played, W—Wins, L—Losses, T—Tied games
  2. Code explanation; All-American—First Team All-American, COTY—Coach of the Year, MVP—Most Valuable Player, FOTY—Rookie of the Year, FOTY—Freshman of the Year, GOTY—Goaltender of the Year, POTY—Player of the Year, DPOTY—Defensive Player of the Year
  3. The American Hockey Coaches Association (AHCA) has selected All-American teams by a formal vote since the 1958–59 season. Prior to 1958, All-Americans were named by coaches.
  4. Minnesota, along with Colorado College, Denver, Michigan, Michigan State, Michigan Tech, and North Dakota, founded the Midwest Collegiate Hockey League in 1951.
  5. The NCAA Division I Coach of the Year is selected by the American Hockey Coaches Association and presented with the Spencer T. Penrose Award.
  6. The MCHL changed its name to the Western Intercollegiate Hockey League prior to the start of the 1953–54 season.
  7. John Mariucci took a one-year leave of absence during the 1955–1956 season to serve as head coach of the U.S. men's hockey team that won the silver medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics. Marsh Ryman served as interim coach during this time.
  8. Prior to the 1958–59 season, Minnesota (along with Michigan, Michigan State and Michigan Tech) withdrew from the WIHL due to a disagreement over recruiting practices. The seven original members of the MCHL founded the Western Collegiate Hockey Association the following season.
  9. From 1959 to 1981, Big Ten standings were determined by regular season WCHA games between Michigan, Michigan State and Minnesota. Ohio State, a non-WCHA member, played two games against Wisconsin in 1969, two against Michigan State in 1971 and two against Minnesota in 1981.
  10. 10.0 10.1 The Denver Post administered the Western Collegiate Hockey Association's MVP award from 1960 to 1981. Since 1981, the league's coaches, players, sports information directors and media have selected the award winner through a balloting process. The MVP award was changed to WCHA Player of the Year in 1992.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Because freshmen were not allowed to play in the WCHA from 1959–60 through 1969–70, the Rookie of the Year award went to the top sophomore. In 1970, the award was renamed the Freshman of the Year and given to the top first-year player. In 1990, the name of the award was changed back to Rookie of the Year.
  12. In December 1971, Glen Sonmor left the Gophers to become the general manager and head coach for the Minnesota Fighting Saints of the World Hockey Association. Ken Yackel, Sr. served as interim coach for the remaining of the 1971–72 season.
  13. Starting with the 1984–85 season, an interlocking schedule with Hockey East was used. Under this arrangement, interconference games counted in conference standings for five seasons.
  14. Doug Woog was suspended for two games during the 1996–1997 season for concealing an illegal payment to a former player after his scholarship ended. During this time, assistant head coach Mike Guentzel served as the team's head coach.
  15. The WCHA Goaltender of the Year Award was awarded for only two seasons, 1987–88 and 1988–89.

ReferencesEdit


This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Minnesota Golden Gophers men's ice hockey seasons. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Ice Hockey Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0 (Unported) (CC-BY-SA).


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