Fandom

Ice Hockey Wiki

List of famous ice hockey linemates

54,183pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

The three forwards – the centre, right wing and left wing – operate as a unit called a line. The tradition of naming the threesomes who compose the hockey teams' lines of attack extends back to the 1920s when Bun Cook, Frank Boucher and Bill Cook of the New York Rangers formed the A Line (named after the A Train, which ran under Madison Square Garden).[1]


Famous NHL lines with nicknamesEdit

  • "The A line"—New Jersey Devils (1999–2002)—Jason Arnott, Patrik Elias, and Petr Sykora; led the Devils to the Stanley Cup in 2000 and to the finals in 2001
  • "The A line/The Bread line"—New York Rangers (1920s)—Frank Boucher, Bill Cook, and Bun Cook; a reference to "Bun" Cook's nickname
  • "The Banana line"—New York Islanders (1978–1980s)—John Tonelli, Wayne Merrick, Bob Nystrom. Named because of the yellow bibs or jerseys the players wore during practice.
  • "The Brat line"—Toronto Maple Leafs (late 1970s)—Tiger Williams, Jack Valiquette, and Pat Boutette
  • The BOW Line—Boston Bruins (1963)—Johnny Bucyk, Murray Oliver, and Tommy Williams
  • The CASH Line[2] - Ottawa Senators (mid-to-late 2000s) Daniel Alfredsson, Jason Spezza, Dany Heatley. The name was an acronym of Captain Alfredsson Spezza Heatley. Also known as the 'Capital Punishment Line' for their high scoring and the team being in the capital of Canada. It was also known as 'The Pizza Line' because the Senators gave free pizzas when the team scored five goals or more, and this trio thereby provided many pizzas for Ottawans. All three were named to the 2009 NHL All-Star game, a feat last achieved in 1980s with the "Triple Crown" line.
  • "The Century line"—Pittsburgh Penguins (1972–76)—Syl Apps Jr., Lowell MacDonald, and Jean Pronovost; also known as "The Bicentennial Line"; scored 100+ goals and 200+ points for 4 straight seasons
  • "The Clydesdale Line"—Chicago Blackhawks (1984–1987)—Curt Fraser, Troy Murray, and Ed Olczyk; each player weighed in at or around 200 pounds. NHL players weighing in excess of 200 pounds was rare in those days.
  • "The Crash Line"—New Jersey Devils (mid-1990s)—Bobby Holik, Randy McKay, and Mike Peluso: average weight of linemates was 215 pounds
  • "The Crazy Eights Line"; Philadelphia Flyers (1990s) Eric Lindros, Mark Recchi, and Brent Fedyk – wore jersey numbers 88, 8 and 18, respectively
  • "The Dynamite line"—Boston Bruins (1928–33) Cooney Weiland, Dutch Gainor, and Dit Clapper
  • "The Dynasty line"[3]—Montreal Canadiens (1970s)—Guy Lafleur, Jacques Lemaire, and Steve Shutt; also with Peter Mahovlich in place of Lemaire; bonus fact: Shutt once called the Lafleur/Mahovlich/Shutt line the "Donut Line" (because it had no centre)
  • "The Espo Line" Boston Bruins (1967–75)—Wayne Cashman, Phil Esposito, and Ken Hodge; also known as "The Nitro line";[3] and "The Dogs of War line"
  • "The Fly line"—New York Rangers (2002)—Eric Lindros, Theo Fleury, and Mike York; the Rangers top three scorers that season.
  • "The Flying Frenchmen"—Montreal Canadiens (1917–19)—Didier Pitre, Jack Laviolette, and Newsy Lalonde
  • "The French Connection"—Buffalo Sabres (1972–1979)—Gilbert Perreault, Rick Martin, and Rene Robert; made up of three French-Canadian players
  • "The GAG line" (Goal-a-Game Line)—New York Rangers (1964–75)—Jean Ratelle, Vic Hadfield, and Rod Gilbert; later dubbed the "TAG (Two-a-Game) Line"
  • "The GEM line"—Atlanta Flames (late 1970s)—Guy Chouinard, Eric Vail, and Bob MacMillan
  • "The GEM line"—Toronto Maple Leafs (late 1980s)—Gary Leeman, Ed Olczyk, and Mark Osborne
  • "The Mafia Line"[4]—New York Rangers (late 1970s)—Don Maloney, Phil Esposito, and Don Murdoch. Nicknamed for a "Godfather" (Esposito) with two "Don's".[4]
  • "The Grind line"—Detroit Red Wings (1990s)—Kirk Maltby, Kris Draper, and Darren McCarty; also with Joey Kocur in place of McCarty
  • "The HEM line"—Toronto Maple Leafs (1960s)—Billy Harris, Gerry Ehman, and Frank Mahovlich
  • "The Hound line"—Toronto Maple Leafs (1980s)—Wendel Clark, Russ Courtnall, and Gary Leeman – all three had played for the Notre Dame Hounds
  • "Hull & Oates"—St. Louis Blues (1990s)—Brett Hull and Adam Oates. A play on the musical duo Hall & Oates.
  • "The HUM line"—Detroit Red Wings (1960s)—Paul Henderson, Norm Ullman, and Bruce MacGregor
  • "The Kid line"—Toronto Maple Leafs (1929–36)—Charlie Conacher, Joe Primeau, and Busher Jackson
  • "The Kraut line"—Boston Bruins (1936–42, 1945–47)—Milt Schmidt, Woody Dumart and Bobby Bauer; all three players were born in Kitchener, Ontario, which was called Berlin before World War I, and whose citizens are mainly of German descent
  • "The LCB line"—Philadelphia Flyers (1970s)—Reggie Leach, Bobby Clarke, and Bill Barber; after the initials of the players' surnames
  • "The Legion of Doom"—Philadelphia Flyers (1994–97)—Eric Lindros, John LeClair and Mikael Renberg
  • "The LILCO line"—New York Islanders (1977–86)—Mike Bossy, Clark Gillies and Bryan Trottier; after Long Island Lighting Company; originally with Billy Harris instead of Bossy; also known as "The Trio Grande Line"[3]
  • "The MAD line"—Toronto Maple Leafs (2002–04)—Mats Sundin, Alexander Mogilny, and Darcy Tucker
  • "The Mattress line"—Vancouver Canucks (2003–04)—Daniel Sedin, Henrik Sedin, and Jason King; after mattress sizes: "Two twins and a king."
  • "The Million Dollar line"—Chicago Blackhawks (1950s–60s)—Bobby Hull, Murray Balfour, Bill Hay
  • "The MPH line"—Chicago Black Hawks (1960s)—Pit Martin, Jim Pappin, and Dennis Hull; after the initials of the players' surnames; it also stands for "miles per hour", a unit of speed
  • "The Olympic Line"—Winnipeg Jets (1992–96)—Teemu Selanne, Alexei Zhamnov, and Keith Tkachuk. Named because each member was an olympian: Selanne Finn, Tkachuk American, and Zhamnov from Russia.
  • "The Option Line"—Pittsburgh Penguins (1990–91)—John Cullen, Mark Recchi, and Kevin Stevens; the line came together when all three players were in the option year of their respective contracts
  • "The Party line"—Chicago Black Hawks (1980s)—Denis Savard, Al Secord, and Steve Larmer
  • "The Pony line"—Chicago Black Hawks (1945–48)—Max Bentley, Doug Bentley, Bill Mosienko[5]
  • "The Production line"—Detroit Red Wings (1947–52)—Sid Abel, Gordie Howe, Ted Lindsay, later with Alex Delvecchio references the booming automotive industry in the Detroit area.
  • "The Production Line II"—Detroit Red Wings (1960s)—Alex Delvecchio, Gordie Howe, Frank Mahovlich
  • "The Punch line"—Montreal Canadiens (1943–48)—Hector "Toe" Blake, Elmer Lach and Maurice "Rocket" Richard
  • "The Russian Five"—Detroit Red Wings (1990s)—Sergei Fedorov, Igor Larionov, Vyacheslav Kozlov, Vladimir Konstantinov, and Viacheslav Fetisov; also known as the "Red Army"
  • "The S line"—Montreal Maroons (1920s)—Nels Stewart, Babe Siebert, Hooley Smith; after the common initial "S" of the players' surnames
  • "The Scooter line"—Chicago Black Hawks (1960s)—Doug Mohns, Stan Mikita, Ken Wharram
  • "The Sky line"—Pittsburgh Penguins (1990s)—Mario Lemieux, Jaromir Jagr, and Kevin Stevens
  • "The Slovak Pack"—St. Louis Blues 1999–2000—Pavol Demitra, Michal Handzus, and Lubos Bartecko
  • "The Speedball Line"—Montreal Canadiens (1927–34, 1937)—Howie Morenz, Aurel Joliat, Johnny "Black Cat" Gagnon—an intelligent play on words that refers to the speed (more Morenz and Joliat) and cleverness (more Gagnon) of its members
  • "The Stastny Brothers'" —Quebec Nordiques (1980's) - Peter Stastny, Anton Stastny and Marian Stastny
  • "The Swedish Five" —Detroit Red Wings (2000s)- Nicklas Lidstrom, Niklas Kronwall, Henrik Zetterberg, Mikael Samuelsson, and Tomas Holmstrom. All five represented the Red Wings at 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino, with Kronwall, Lidstrom, and Zetterberg scoring all of Team Sweden's goals against Finland in the Gold Medal game. Also, in the final game, Lidstrom, Zetterberg, Kronwall, and Samuelsson all accounted for five points between themselves.
  • "The Trio Grande Line"—New York Islanders (1970–1980s)—Clark Gillies, Bryan Trottier, and Mike Bossy
  • "The Triple Crown Line"—Los Angeles Kings (1970s–80s)—Dave Taylor, Charlie Simmer and Marcel Dionne; a reference to the Kings' logo, which features a crown; this was the first line in NHL history where each player scored 100 points or more in the same season (1980–81 NHL season).
  • "The Uke line"—Boston Bruins (1957–64)—Bronco Horvath, Johnny Bucyk, Vic Stasiuk; referring to the players' Ukrainian ancestry
  • "The West Coast Express"—Vancouver Canucks (2000–2006)—Markus Naslund, Brendan Morrison, and Todd Bertuzzi; reference to local commuter rail service of the same name
  • "ZZ Pops" The current New Jersey Devils line of Zach Parise, Travis Zajac and Jamie Langenbrunner

Famous non-NHL lines with nicknamesEdit

  • "The Army Line"—HC CSKA Moscow Soviet league (1970s)—Valeri Kharlamov (LW), Boris Mikhailov (RW), Vladimir Petrov (C)
  • "The Coneheads Line"—USA Hockey, 1980 Winter Olympics, "Miracle on Ice" team—Mark Pavelich, John Harrington, Buzz Schneider; after the famous Saturday Night Live sketch series Coneheads, because they played a strange or 'alien' style. All three players were from the Iron Range in Northeast Minnesota[6]
  • "The DDT Line"—Ice hockey at the 2003 World Championships, 2004 World Championships, & 2004 World Cup of Hockey (for Canada)—Kris Draper, Shane Doan, Joe Thornton; after the initials of the players' surnames[7]
  • "The KLM line"—Soviet national ice hockey team (1980s)—Vladimir Krutov, Igor Larionov, Sergei Makarov; after the initials of the players' surnames; also known as "The Green Line" because they wore green jerseys in practice.
  • "Les Trois Denis"—Montreal Juniors (late 1970s)—Denis Cyr, Denis Tremblay, Denis Savard; A line that featured three players who all were named Denis, all were born on February 4, 1961, and all grew up in the same neighbourhood in Verdun, Quebec. Was dominant in the QMJHL for a couple of years.[8]
  • "The Hanson Brothers"—fictional checking line from the 1977 movie Slap Shot based on the real-life Carlson brothers.
  • "The Jönsson Gang"—Färjestad BK, Sweden (2000s)—Jörgen Jönsson, Peter Nordström, Pelle Prestberg and for a while instead of Prestberg, Hannes Hyvönen; Named after a serie of films with the same name.
  • "The Huey, Dewey, and Louie line"—Team Finland (1994–1995)—Ville Peltonen (LW), Saku Koivu (C) and Jere Lehtinen (RW; The lineup debuted in 1994 Winter Olympics and made an instant impact on Finnish National Team's play during the tournament. The lineup was later on used during 1995 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships, where Finland won their first ever Gold Medals. The play of the lineup gained international attraction and later on, the trio would go on and have a career in NHL with Koivu for Montreal Canadiens, Lehtinen for Dallas Stars and finally; Peltonen, gaining his spot in the NHL after a lengthy struggle, playing for San Jose Sharks, Nashville Predators and Florida Panthers.
  • "The Blue-line"—Team Czech (1996)- Martin Procházka (Right wing), Pavel Patera (Center) and Otakar Vejvoda (Left wing); The lineup played at 1996 World hockey championship in Vien, where Czech republic boosted for its first gold medal after separation from Slovakia in 1993. Blue-line substantially helped the Czech representation in beating favorited teams such as team Canada in final, team Sweden or team Finland. Otakar Vejvoda was later voted as the best left winger at the tournament, while Pavel Patera was the second best player in scoring (with 8 points) and Martin Prochazka scored the wining goal at the final against Canada just few seconds before end of the game. In the seaseon 1994-95 all three forwards were top three scorers in Czech Extra league, while Pavel Patera was first with 75 pts, Martin Procházka settled second place with 58 pts and Otakar Vejvoda finished season at third place with 56 pts. After world hockey championship in 1996 trio moved together to AIK Stockholm, but soon after Martin Procházka moved to NHL, whereas Otakar Vejvoda ended his hopefull career because of health problems in 1998. That was definitive end of the Blue-line, although Martin Procházka and Pavel Patera played together again after few years of separation, and both of them were members of Czech wining team at the Winter Olympics 1998 in Nagano. So called blue-line was named after blue jerseys of their home club HC Poldi Kladno, where all three forwards were played at the first half of 90´s.
  • "The Shark Line"—Team Canada (2010)—Joe Thornton (C), Dany Heatley (RW), and Patrick Marleau (LW), all of whom play for the San Jose Sharks of the NHL. They are known sometimes as "The Olympic Line" among San Jose fans.

Current, short-lived and/or novelty linesEdit

  • "The Two Kids & An Old Goat line"—Detroit Red Wings—Henrik Zetterberg, Pavel Datsyuk, Brett Hull, originally with Boyd Devereaux in place of Zetterberg.
  • "The 700 Pound line"—Boston Bruins—Joe Thornton, Glen Murray, Mike Knuble
  • "The A Line"—New Jersey Devils—Patrik Eliáš, Jason Arnott, and Petr Sýkora
  • "The ABC line"—Chicago Blackhawks—Tyler Arnason, Mark Bell, and Kyle Calder
  • "The AMP line"—Colorado Avalanche (2000s)—Alex Tanguay, Milan Hejduk, Peter Forsberg; after the initials of the players' given names
  • "The Ash Line"—New York Islanders—Arron Asham, Alexei Yashin, Oleg Kvasha; after the common string "ash" in their last names
  • "The Bay Street Bullies"—Toronto Maple Leafs—Shayne Corson, Darcy Tucker, Gary Roberts
  • "The BBC line"—Carolina Hurricanes (2000s)—Bates Battaglia, Rod Brind'Amour, Erik Cole
  • "The Big Line"—Minnesota Wild (2000s)—Brian Rolston, Pavol Demitra, Marian Gaborik; Line consisting of the Wild's top scorers, though rarely play together, hence the "Big" line.
  • "The BOZ line"—Toronto Maple Leafs—Bill Berg, Mark Osborne, Peter Zezel
  • "The Brothers Line"—Vancouver Canucks (2000s)—Henrik Sedin, Daniel Sedin, Anson Carter; the Sedins are the only twins picked one right after the other (Daniel went second and Henrik third in the 1999 NHL Entry Draft), and Carter is black and is known as "Soul Brother".
  • "The Bulldog Line"—New York Rangers—Steve Vickers, Walt Tkaczuk, Bill Fairbairn
  • "The Burger Line"—San Jose Sharks—Joe Thornton, Dany Heatley, Patrick Marleau — an online poll conducted by Sharks play-by-play announcer Randy Hahn resulted in the nickname Jumbo Heated Patty, or The Burger Line. (Also known as the HTMLine, from the initials of their last names.) With the addition of defensemen Dan Boyle and Marc-Édouard Vlasic, also of the Sharks, The Hockey News dubbed them "Boiled Jumbo Heated Patty with Pickles."
  • "The Crash line"—New Jersey Devils—Mike Peluso, Bobby Holík, and Randy McKay
  • "CVS Line"—Hartford Whalers—Andrew Cassels, Pat Verbeek, Geoff Sanderson; Named for the first letter of each player's surname.
  • "Czech-mate line"—New York Rangers—Jan Hlavac left wing, Radek Dvorak right wing, and Petr Nedved center.
  • "Czechs-Mex line"—Edmonton Oilers—Raffi Torres, Petr Sýkora and Ales Hemsky. (Named because the latter two are Czechs, and Torres is a Canadian of Hispanic descent.)
  • "The Dan Line"—Philadelphia Flyers—Dan Kordic (LW), Daniel Lacroix (C), and Scott Daniels (RW); Also known as "The Fighting Dans", obviously because they all had "Dan" involved with their name. They were a rough checking line for the Flyers in the 1996–97 season.
  • "The Deuces Wild Line"—Philadelphia Flyers—Simon Gagné, Peter Forsberg, and Mike Knuble; so named because they wear the uniform numbers 12, 21, and 22 respectively.
  • "The Dice Line"—Calgary Flames—Colin Patterson, Richard Kromm, and Carey Wilson; so named because their uniform numbers were 11, 22, and 33 respectively.
  • "The EGG line"—New Jersey Devils—Patrik Eliáš, Scott Gomez, and Brian Gionta. (The Devs had great success with this line, winning the Stanley Cup with them in the 2002–03 season.)
  • "The Finnish Sandwich"—Edmonton Oilers—Wayne Gretzky, Jari Kurri, and Esa Tikkanen (Kurri and Tikkanen are Finns)
  • "The FLY line"—New York Rangers—Theoren Fleury, Eric Lindros, and Mike York
  • "FTD Line" (They always delivered)—Hartford Whalers—Ron Francis, Sylvain Turgeon, Kevin Dineen
  • The "GAS line"—Boston Bruins (2000s)—Bill Guerin, Jason Allison, Sergei Samsonov
  • The "Greek God line"—Atlanta Thrashers—Eric Boulton, Jim Slater, and Chris Thorburn
  • "The Grumpy Old Men line"[9]—Dallas Stars (2000–01)—Kirk Muller, John MacLean, and Mike Keane. The line was named for the veteran status each player had, and was a play on the film "Grumpy Old Men". Between them, they had 104 years and 5 Stanely Cup rings.[9]
  • The "Capital Punishment" Line-Ottawa Senators (late 1990s)-consisted of Alexei Yashin, Shawn McEachern, and Andreas Dackell, who were one of the NHL's highest scoring lines at that time
  • "The High Speed Line"—Philadelphia Flyers (Early 1980s)—Ray Allison, Ron Flockhart, Brian Propp
  • The "HMO Line"—New York Rangers (2005–06)—Ryan Hollweg, Dominic Moore, Jed Ortmeyer
  • "The Ikea Line" Vancouver Canucks (2000s)—Henrik Sedin, Daniel Sedin, Markus Naslund. Each person is from Sweden and refers to the IKEA company originating from Sweden
  • "The JAM Line"-Colorado Avalanche (2000s)-Joe Sakic, Alex Tanguay, Milan Hejduk. This line got its name because of the first letter of each players first name.
  • The "Kid Line" / "PPG Line"—Anaheim Ducks (2006–07)—Corey Perry, Ryan Getzlaf, Dustin Penner
  • "The Kid Line"-St. Louis Blues (2008–present)-David Perron, T.J. Oshie, Patrik Berglund. The line got its name because Oshie and Berglund were rookies in the 2008-09 season and Perron was only in his second year as an NHL player
  • "The KLS line"—Pittsburgh Penguins—Alexei Kovalev, Robert Lang, Martin Straka
  • "The LAPD Line"—Los Angeles Kings (2001–2002)— Jason Allison, Ziggy Palffy, Adam Deadmarsh
  • The Little White Russian line—Atlanta Thrashers (2008–present)—Bryan Little, Todd White, and Slava Kozlov
  • "The Life Line"-Winnipeg Jets (1982) Brian Mullen, Paul MacLean and Dale hawerchuk
  • "The Lord of the Rings Line"—Toronto Maple Leafs (2006)—Alexei Ponikarovsky, Kyle Wellwood, Nik Antropov. (Frodo and the Two Towers)
  • "The Lucky 7's Line"—New York Islanders (2001–2003)—Shawn Bates, Michael Peca, and Mark Parrish; highly productive line. Name coined by Islanders broadcaster John Weideman because each of the linemate's uniform numbers ended in a 7 (Bates 17, Peca 27, Parrish 37).
  • "The Maginot Line"—Buffalo Sabres (2004)—Jean-Pierre Dumont, Danny Briere, Jochen Hecht; Two French Canadians and a German from the border city of Buffalo.
  • "The Mattress line"—Vancouver Canucks—Daniel Sedin, Henrik Sedin, and Jason King; the Sedins are twin brothers, so together the line was two twins and a king.
  • "The Minnesota Line"—Philadelphia Flyers—Shjon Podein (LW), Joel Otto (C), Trent Klatt (RW); the three players are all from Minnesota and were known for their tenacious defensive play as the Flyers made the Stanley Cup Finals in 1997
  • "Monty Babcock's Flying Circus"—Detroit Red Wings (2006–present)—Henrik Zetterberg, Pavel Datsyuk, Tomas Holmstrom; named arose from a line naming contest on a popular hockey website.
  • "The MVP line"—Tampa Bay Lightning (2006)—Martin St. Louis, Vincent Lecavalier, Vaclav Prospal; stands for Marty, Vinny, and Prospal, also Martin St. Louis won the Hart memorial trophy as league MVP in 2004 and Vincent Lecavalier was nominated for the Lester B. Pearson award in 2007.
  • "The 'OMG' Line"—Phoenix Coyotes—Oleg Saprykin, Mike Zigomanis, and Georges Laraque
  • "The 'Ov' line"—San Jose Sharks—Johan Garpenlöv, Igor Larionov, and Sergei Makarov
  • "The PB&J (Peanut-Butter and Jelly) Line—Montreal Canadiens, Alexander Perezhogin, Radek Bonk, and Mike Johnson. All three players left the team in 2007 to Free Agency but they were a decent shutdown trio.
  • "The Plumbers"—Washington Capitals—Greg Adams, Craig Laughlin, Alan Haworth; named for their hard working efforts, and, of course, Richard Nixon's White House "plumbers"
  • "The Power of the Pens" line—Pittsburgh Penguins—Mario Lemieux (C), Jaromir Jagr (RW), Ron Francis (LW)
  • "Price Club Line", Michigan Wolverines (2003–04) T.J. Hensick, Milan Gajic and Brandon Kaleniecki (because they score in bulk)
  • "RAV line"—Buffalo Sabres (2005–2009)—Thomas Vanek (LW), Derek Roy (C), Maxim Afinogenov (RW). Named for the initials of their surnames.
  • "The RPM Line"—Edmonton Oilers—Marty Reasoner (C), Fernando Pisani (RW), and Ethan Moreau (LW); after the players' surnames.
  • The SARS line – 2004 Eastern Conference All-Star Team – Mats Sundin (C), Daniel Alfredsson (RW), Gary Roberts (LW) ; after the players' surnames (SAR) and because of the SARS outbreak in Ontario in 2004
  • "The Sesame Street Line"—Philadelphia Flyers (1970s)—Dave Schultz (Grouch), Orest Kindrachuk (Oscar or Ernie), Don Saleski (Big Bird)
  • "The Shamrock Line"—New York Rangers (2006–07)— Brendan Shanahan (LW), Matt Cullen (C), and Ryan Callahan (RW); in reference to the strong Irish heritage held in each player, Sean Avery was used as center instead of Matt Cullen when the Rangers acquired him from the Los Angeles Kings.
  • The "Smurf Line"—Montreal Canadiens—Saku Koivu (C), Valeri Bure (LW) and Oleg Petrov (RW); after their relatively small height.
  • "The 'SOB' Line" Washington Capitals—Alexander Semin, Alex Ovechkin, and Nicklas Backstrom. Also known as "the Care Bears" for their penchant for trying to be "too cute".
  • "The Skyline"—Toronto Maple Leafs—Joe Nieuwendyk (C), Nikolai Antropov (RW), and Alexei Ponikarovsky (LW) (Named because of each of the players is above average height; Nieuwendyk is 6-feet-2-inches, Ponikarovsky is 6' 4" and Antropov is 6' 6")
  • "The Slovakian Trio"—Minnesota Wild (2000s)—Branko Radivojevic, Pavol Demitra, Marián Gáborík; all come from Slovakian descent. Used early in the 2006–2007 regular and post-season. Also: The "Super Slovaks"; "The Trencin Trio"
  • The "S-MAC-K Line"—Anaheim Ducks—(2007)—Teemu Selänne, Andy McDonald and Chris Kunitz.
  • "The Sunrise Express"—Florida Panthers—(2008-)—Stephen Weiss, Nathan Horton, and David Booth; after the Panthers' home in Sunrise, Florida. Also referred to as "the Sunshine Express."
  • "The Swedish Connection"—Vancouver Canucks—Daniel Sedin, Henrik Sedin, Markus Naslund; also "The Swedish Triple"; "IKEA line"; "Torpedo Line"
  • "The Special K Line" - Mighty Ducks of Anaheim - (1995) - Paul Kariya, Todd Krygier and Chad Kilger
  • "The Speed Team"—Columbus Blue Jackets—Manny Malhotra (C), Jason Chimera (LW), Dan Fritsche (RW).
  • "The Swedish Five"—Detroit Red Wings/Team Sweden Olympics 2006 (2000s)—Mikael Samuelsson (RW), Henrik Zetterberg (C), Tomas Holmström (LW), Niklas Kronwall (RD), and Nicklas Lidstrom (LD); all got points for team Sweden in the gold medal game. Also the first NHL line assembled with all Swedish players. Name is reminiscent of Russian Five.
  • The "Team USA Line"—St. Louis Blues—Keith Tkachuk (LW), Doug Weight (C), and Bill Guerin (RW); also "American Pie" line
  • The Two-Headed Monster—Pittsburgh Penguins—Sidney Crosby (C) paired with Evgeni Malkin (RW). Term coined by FSN Pittsburgh broadcasters Paul Steigerwald and Bob Errey.
  • The "United Nations Line"—Colorado Avalanche—Valery Kamensky (Russian), Peter Forsberg (Swedish), Claude Lemieux (Canadian); also "Barrage-A-Trois"
  • "Vowel line"—Nashville Predators (2001–02)—Martin Erat (LW), Vladimir Orszagh (RW), Denis Arkhipov (C). Named for the first letter of each player's surname.
  • "VHS Line"—Phoenix Coyotes (2007)—Radim Vrbata (RW), Martin Hanzal (C), Fredrik Sjöström (LW). Named for the first letter of each player's surname.
  • "The White Line"—Minnesota Wild (2006–07)—Brian Rolston (LW), Todd White (C), Pierre-Marc Bouchard (RW)
  • The "ZZ Pops" line New Jersey Devils (2007–present) – Zack Parise (LW), Travis Zajac (C), and Jamie Langenbrunner (RW) (Named because of the two young "Z"'s and Langenbrunner, being the seasoned veteran, is the "Pop". This is a play on the rock group ZZ Top
  • "The Blackhawk Down Line" Philadelphia Flyers – Jeremy Roenick, Tony Amonte, Alexei Zhamnov (all three are former Chicago Blackhawks)
  • The "HBO Line"—New York Rangers—Ryan Hollweg (LW), Blair Betts (C), and Colton Orr (RW). Named for the three players surnames, and is a play on HBO.
  • The "Steel City Line"—Pittsburgh Penguins—Ryan Malone (LW), Evgeni Malkin (C), and Petr Sýkora (RW). Named because of the "Steel City" connection between Malkin and Sýkora, two former Metallurg Magnitogorsk (of the Russian Super League) teammates, and Pittsburgh native Malone. Also called the "Syko-Ma-Ma" Line.
  • The "RPM Line"—Colorado Avalanche (2007–2009)—Ryan Smyth (LW), Paul Stastny (C), Milan Hejduk (RW).
  • The "Peach Fuzz Line"—Boston Bruins (2008–present)—Milan Lucic (LW), David Krejci (C), Phil Kessel (RW). So-called due to the young age of all three players (Lucic, 20; Kessel, 21; Krejci, 22).
  • The "Center City Line"—Philadelphia Flyers (2008–09)—Scott Hartnell (LW), Jeff Carter (C), Joffrey Lupul (RW). Named because all of the members live in Center City (Philadelphia)- also called "Wig Line" or "Hair Line" – referring to Scott Hartnell's hair & the resulting wig giveaway at a recent home game.
  • The "RPM Line" —Vancouver Canucks (2009)—Ryan Kesler (LW), Mats Sundin (C), Pavol Demitra (RW).
  • The 'SWAT' Line (SWT)—Toronto Maple Leafs (2000's)—Mats Sundin, Kyle Wellwood and Darcy Tucker. Named for their first initials.
  • "Two Blondes and a Brunette" (2B&B)—Minnesota Wild (2008–present)—Mikko Koivu (C), Antti Miettinen (RW), Andrew Brunette (LW). Named for Koivu and Miettinen's hair color and Brunette's last name.
  • "The RPG Line" -Anaheim Ducks-(2009-present) Bobby Ryan, Corey Perry, and Ryan Getzlaf.
  • "The Munchkin Line" -Montreal Canadiens (2009-present)-Mike Cammalleri, Scott Gomez, Brian Gionta. Named for the small height of the trio (not one of them topping 5'10).

Famous forward combinations without acknowledged nicknamesEdit

  • Detroit Red Wings--Henrik Zetterberg and Pavel Datsyuk (the "Euro twins")
  • Florida Panthers—Valeri Bure, Viktor Kozlov, Pavel Bure
  • Dallas Stars (1990s)—Brett Hull, Mike Modano and Jere Lehtinen
  • Detroit Red Wings (1930s)—Herbie Lewis, Marty Barry and Larry Aurie
  • Los Angeles Kings—Wayne Gretzky, Tomas Sandström and Tony Granato
  • Mighty Ducks of Anaheim—Paul Kariya, Steve Rucchin and Teemu Selänne
  • Montreal Canadiens—Jean Béliveau, Dickie Moore and Bernie Geoffrion
  • New York Rangers—Adam Graves, Mark Messier and Alexei Kovalev
  • New York Rangers—Martin Straka, Michael Nylander, and Jaromír Jágr
  • Pittsburgh Penguins—Mario Lemieux, Jaromír Jágr and Ron Francis (sometimes called the Great Line)
  • Toronto Maple Leafs—Lanny McDonald, Darryl Sittler and Errol Thompson
  • Winnipeg Jets (WHA)—Bobby Hull, Anders Hedberg and Ulf Nilsson (sometimes called "the Hot Line")
  • Springfield Indians (AHL)—Joe Day, Yvon Corriveau and Dale Henry (sometimes known as the Piranhas)
  • Quebec Aces (QSHL)—Herb Carnegie, Ossie Carnegie and Manny McIntyre—the Black Aces.
  • Tampa Bay Lightning—Martin St. Louis, Brad Richards and Fredrik Modin
  • Team Finland (1998, 2004, 2006) Jere Lehtinen, Saku Koivu and Teemu Selänne
  • HPK (Finland, 2002–03)—Antti Miettinen (LW), Tommi Santala (C) and Eero Somervuori (RW)
  • HPK (Finland), 2000s)—Jukka Hentunen, Niko Kapanen and Timo Pärssinen (sometimes called "The Teletubby-line")
  • Jokerit (Finland), 1970s)—Timo Turunen, Pentti Hiiros, Timo Kyntölä ("cap gun line")

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki