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Glenn Hall

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Glenn Hall
Glennhall
Position Goaltender
Caught Left
Height
Weight
5 ft 11 in (1.8 m)
190 lb (86 kg)
Teams AHL
Indianapolis Capitals
NHL
Detroit Red Wings
Chicago Black Hawks
St. Louis Blues
Nationality Flag of Canada Canadian
Born October 3 1931 (1931-10-03) (age 82),
Humboldt, SASK, CAN
Pro Career 1951 – 1971
Hall of Fame, 1975

Glenn Henry "Mr. Goalie" Hall' (born October 3, 1931, in Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada) is a former professional goaltender. During his National Hockey League career with the Detroit Red Wings, Chicago Black Hawks, and St. Louis Blues, Hall seldom missed a game and was a consistent performer, winning the Vezina Trophy three times, and the Calder Memorial Trophy. Nicknamed "Mr. Goalie", he was one of the first goaltenders to develop and make effective use of the butterfly style of goalkeeping.

Professional playing careerEdit

Detroit stintsEdit

After finishing his junior years playing for the Humboldt Indians and the Windsor Spitfires, he signed with the Detroit Red Wings in 1949. The first few years of his NHL career were spent playing in Detroit's minor system. In the 1952 playoffs he was called up from the minors to be the backup goalie in the finals, but did not play for Detroit. Detroit still put Hall's name on the Stanley Cup, before he had ever played his first NHL game. He finally made the Detroit Red Wings lineup as their starting goalie in the 1955–56 season, as Terry Sawchuk was traded to the Boston Bruins.. Hall played in every game of his first full season with the Red Wings, recording twelve shutouts, and winning the Calder Memorial Trophy as rookie of the year.

VaskoHall

Hal and defenceman Elmer Vasko.

Chicago stintEdit

During his second full season with Detroit, he again played every single game. At season's end, the Red Wings reaccquired Sawchuk from the Boston Bruins. Hall found himself traded to the Chicago Black Hawks along with Ted Lindsay. Hall continued his stellar play in the Windy City, playing every single regular-season game as well as every playoff game. As his consecutive game streak continued, his legend grew with it. In 1961, Hall backstopped the Black Hawks to their first Stanley Cup Championship since 1938 (the second of Hall's career) — over, of all teams, Detroit. On November 8, 1962, the record streak finally came to an end against the Boston Bruins; Hall had back problems. Denis DeJordy won replaced him during the game. Hall managed to play 502 consecutive complete games, which spanned eight seasons, an NHL record that will probably never be broken. Even more amazingly, he never wore a goaltending mask or helmet during the streak. It was only late in his career that he wore a mask.

GHallBlues

Hall with the St. Louis Blues

Later successEdit

The Black Hawks could only protect one goaltender in the 1967 NHL Expansion Draft so they went with the younger Denis Dejordy. Therefore, despite winning the Vezina Trophy in 1967, Hall was left unprotected. The 36-year-old veteran was chosen by the St. Louis Blues. The Blues, one of six expansion franchises in their first year in the league, stocked themselves with veteran talent, and won first place in the new division. Hall's play led them all the way to the Stanley Cup finals. Most hockey fans expected an utter rout when the established Canadiens faced the 1st-year expansion Blues. But this was Hall's third trip to the finals, and his goaltending was the most outstanding contribution to the surprisingly good performance of the Blues against the Montreal Canadiens. The Blues lost the best-of-seven series getting swept 4–0, but in 4 exciting 1-goal games (3–2 (OT), 1–0. 4–3 (OT), and 3–2). Hall's remarkable play was recognized by the award to him of the Conn Smythe Trophy as the playoffs' Most Valuable Player, an award rarely going to a player from a losing team.

In 1968, veteran goaltending legend Jacques Plante joined the Blues, sharing duties with Hall. The two put together a fine season and shared the Vezina Trophy at the end of the 1968–69 NHL season.

RetirementEdit

He had retired after the 1968–69 season, but Hall came out of retirement to play 18 games in 1969–70 season.

Hall's great career ended after the 1970–71 season when he announced his retirement at the age of 40. In 1975 he was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame. Hall won his third Stanley Cup as the Goaltender Coach with Calgary Flames in 1989.

LegacyEdit

Glenn Hall ended his brilliant career with 407 Wins, 84 Shutouts, a career GAA of 2.49, and voted to 11 All-Star Games. Hall is widely regarded as one of the first NHL goalies to master the butterfly style of goaltending. He is thought of by many as one of the best goalies to ever play the game. Hall still holds the record for the most First Team All-Star selections (7) which he did while playing the same era as other greats, Sawchuk and Plante (as well as other Hall of Famers, like Johnny Bower, Gump Worsley, and Roger Crozier).

In 1998, he was ranked number 16 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players.

In 2005, the City of Humboldt, Saskatchewan erected a permanent monument to Glenn's career in Glenn Hall Park on Highway #5 (Glenn Hall Drive). The tribute includes highlights of Glenn's career from his junior days in Humboldt until his retirement from the NHL.


Career statistics Edit

Season Team League GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA SV%
1947–48 Humboldt Indians SJHL 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 3.40 0
1948–49 Humboldt Indians SJHL 24 13 9 2 -- -- 1 3.63 --
1949–50 Windsor Spitfires OHA-Jr. 43 31 11 1 -- -- 0 3.53 --
1950–51 Windsor Spitfires OHA-Jr. 54 32 18 4 -- -- 6 3.09 --
1951–52 Indianapolis Capitals AHL 68 22 40 6 -- -- -- 3.89 --
1951–52 Detroit Red Wings NHL 27 25 2 0 2122 147 3 1.79 --
1952–53 Edmonton Flyers WHL 63 27 27 9 360 10 -- -- --
1952–53 Detroit Red Wings NHL 6 4 1 1 -- -- 1 1.67 --
1953–54 Edmonton Flyers WHL 70 29 30 11 -- -- 0 3.70 --
1954–55 Edmonton Flyers WHL 66 38 18 10 -- -- 5 2.83 --
1954–55 Detroit Red Wings NHL 2 2 0 0 120 2 -- 1.00 .967
1955–56 Detroit Red Wings NHL 70 30 24 16 4200 147 12 2.10 .922
1956–57 Detroit Red Wings NHL 70 38 20 12 4200 156 4 2.23 .927
1957–58 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 24 39 7 4200 200 7 2.86 .909
1958–59 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 28 29 13 4200 208 1 2.97 .897
1959–60 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 28 29 13 4200 180 6 2.57 .918
1960–61 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 29 24 17 4200 176 6 2.51 .920
1961–62 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 31 26 13 4200 185 9 2.64 .913
1962–63 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 66 30 20 15 3910 166 5 2.55 .915
1963–64 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 65 34 19 11 3860 148 7 2.30 .929
1964–65 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 41 18 17 5 2440 99 4 2.43 .922
1965–66 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 64 31 24 7 3747 164 4 2.63 .917
1966–67 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 32 19 5 5 1664 66 2 2.38 .921
1967–68 St. Louis Blues NHL 49 19 21 9 2858 118 5 2.48 .918
1968–69 St. Louis Blues NHL 41 19 12 8 2354 85 8 2.17 --
1969–70 St. Louis Blues NHL 18 7 8 3 1010 49 1 2.91 --
1970–71 St. Louis Blues NHL 31 13 11 8 1761 71 2 2.42 .916
NHL totals 906 407 326 162 53,544 2230 84 2.49 --


Preceded by
Dave Keon
Winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy
1968
Succeeded by
Serge Savard
Preceded by
Ed Litzenberger
Winner of the Calder Trophy
1956
Succeeded by
Larry Regan
Preceded by
Jacques Plante
Winner of the Vezina Trophy
1963
Succeeded by
Charlie Hodge
Preceded by
Gump Worsley
and Charlie Hodge
Winner of the Vezina Trophy
with Denis DeJordy

1967
Succeeded by
Rogatien Vachon
and Gump Worsley
Preceded by
Rogatien Vachon
and Gump Worsley
Winner of the Vezina Trophy
with Jacques Plante

1969
Succeeded by
Tony Esposito


This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Glenn Hall. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Ice Hockey Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0 (Unported) (CC-BY-SA).


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