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Bryan Trottier

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Bryan Trottier
Bryantrottier
Position centre
Nickname(s) Trots
Teams New York Islanders
Pittsburgh Penguins
Nationality Flag of Canada & Flag of the United States
Born July 17 1956 (1956-07-17) (age 60),
Val Marie, Saskatchewan, Canada
Pro Career 19751994

Bryan John Trottier (born - July 17, 1956, in Val Marie, Saskatchewan, Canada)[1] is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey centre who played 18 seasons in the National Hockey League for the New York Islanders and Pittsburgh Penguins. He won four Stanley Cup rings with the Islanders, two with the Penguins and one as an assistant coach with the Colorado Avalanche.

Playing careerEdit

Nicknamed "Trots", he was drafted in 2nd. Round, 22nd. overall by the New York Islanders in the 1974 NHL Amateur Draft (and by the Cincinnati Stingers 18th overall in the 197 4nhl Amateur Draft). Trottier played his first fifteen seasons in the NHL with the Islanders.[2] He won the Calder Trophy as the league's Rookie of the year in 1975-76. Trottier was one of the core players on the Islanders dynasty teams from the 1980s. He won four Stanley Cups during his time with the Islanders, 1979-80, 1980-81, 1981-82, and 1982-83. During the Islanders' first Stanley Cup in 1979-80, he won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. His best offensive season was 1978-79 when he had 134 points which earned him the Art Ross Trophy as well as the Hart Trophy as league MVP. In winning the Art Ross, he became the first player from a post-Original Six expansion team to win the award. In that same season, he led the NHL in assists with 87, something he did the year before as well with 77 assists.

Despite Wayne Gretzky's dominance and scoring records, Trottier was still universally regarded as the game's best all-around player in the early 1980s combining potent offense, rock-solid defense, and expert play on special teams. Trottier was often referred to as the "glue" on the Isles team, centering his fellow stars Denis Potvin, Clark Gillies, Bob Nystrom, and Mike Bossy. Following his 13th season, Trottier's skills seemed to deteriorate precipitously, decreasing from 82 points in 1988 to 45 points just one year later, and 24 points in 1990. The long run of success of the Islanders playoff runs seemed to have caught up with Trottier.

Undaunted by heavy criticism from fellow Canadians, Trottier chose to play for Team USA in the 1984 Canada Cup tournament, after playing for Team Canada in 1981, because he wanted to pay back the country in which he lived and because his wife was American. He was able to obtain the necessary U.S. citizenship in July 1984 because he had Métis ancestry on his father's side (Cree/Chippewa). His North American Indian Card (which he qualified for because his grandmother was a Chippewa) entitled him to citizenship in both the U.S. and Canada, as well as a U.S. passport, which was all he needed for tournament eligibility.

In 1990, the Islanders believed that Trottier's best years were behind him and that younger centers such as Pat LaFontaine and Brent Sutter should get his ice time. The Islanders released Trottier from his contract. He ranks second in Islanders history in goals, and first in assists and points. The Pittsburgh Penguins signed him as a free agent to provide experience and leadership to a young team. Trottier won the Stanley Cup for the fifth and sixth times with Pittsburgh in 1991 and 1992. He then briefly retired, returning to the Isles in a front office capacity, but financial troubles, stemming from bad investments, forced Trottier to return to the ice for the 1993-94 season. He retired again following a disappointing final season where he scored only 4 goals in 41 games. At the time of his retirement, his point total ranked 6th in NHL history. Trottier was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 1997.[3]


Records and AchievementsEdit

  • Most Career Games (New York Islanders)- 1123
  • Most Career Points (New York Islanders)- 1353
  • Most Career Assists (New York Islanders)- 853
  • Most Points in a Season (New York Islanders)- 134 in 1978-79 , surpassed by Mike Bossy (147 in 1981-82 )
  • Most Assists in a Season (New York Islanders)- 87 in 1978-79
  • Fastest player in NHL history to reach 400 Points- 296 GP, surpassed by Mike Bossy (283 GP) and currently held by Wayne Gretzky (197 GP)
  • Fastest player in NHL history to reach 500 Points- 362 GP, surpassed by Mike Bossy (349 GP) and currently held by Wayne Gretzky (234 GP)
  • Fastest player in NHL history to reach 600 Points- 435 GP, surpassed by Mike Bossy (400 GP) and currently held by Wayne Gretzky (274 GP)
  • Fastest player in NHL history to reach 700 Points- 506 GP, surpassed and currently held by Wayne Gretzky (317 GP)
  • Fastest player in NHL history to reach 200 Assists- 253 GP, surpassed and currently held by Wayne Gretzky (165 GP)
  • Fastest player in NHL history to reach 300 Assists- 343 GP, surpassed and currently held by Wayne Gretzky (229 GP)
  • He was the youngest player in NHL history to score 200 goals (24 years, 98 days) until he was surpassed by Mike Bossy (23 years, 315 days).
  • He was the youngest player in NHL history to score 300 points (22 years, 102 days) until he was surpassed by Wayne Gretzky (20 years, 68 days).
  • He was the youngest player in NHL history to score 400 points (22 years, 239 days) until he was surpassed by Wayne Gretzky (20 years, 335 days).
  • He was the youngest player in NHL history to score 500 points (23 years, 208 days) until he was surpassed by Wayne Gretzky (21 years, 52 days).
  • He was the youngest player in NHL history to score 600 points (24 years, 187 days) until he was surpassed by Wayne Gretzky (21 years, 330 days).
  • He was the youngest player in NHL history to score 700 points (25 years, 190 days) until he was surpassed by Wayne Gretzky (22 years, 62 days).
  • He was the youngest player in NHL history to score 800 points (26 years, 162 days) until he was surpassed by Wayne Gretzky (22 years, 325 days).
  • He was the youngest player in NHL history to score 900 points (27 years, 149 days) until he was surpassed by Wayne Gretzky (23 years, 47 days).

Post-retirement Edit

Trottier again became a topic of controversy after many of his Islander teammates, including linemates Mike Bossy and Clark Gillies were honored by the Islander organization by having their numbers retired. Trottier, still reeling from his financial difficulties, wanted significant financial compensation for his appearance to retire his number 19, delaying the ceremonies for years. His number was finally raised to the rafters on October 20, 2001.

After serving as an assistant coach in Pittsburgh until 1997, he took a similar position with the Colorado Avalanche, where he garnered his seventh career Stanley Cup ring in 2001. He was hired as head coach of the New York Rangers in 2002. Trottier was fired after just half a season with the Rangers.

On March 4, 2006, the New York Islanders celebrated the 26th anniversary of their first Stanley Cup championship. He gave a familiar salute to the fans who lined up to watch a pregame "Walk of Champions" entering the building, raising both hands high above his head, reminiscent of his days playing on the Island where he would do the same to the fans cheering him on. On June 1, 2006 Trottier returned to the Islanders as Executive Director of Player Personnel.

Trottier is currently 14th all-time in regular season points, having been passed by Jaromir Jagr and Joe Sakic during the 2005-06 NHL season. He is 9th all-time in playoff points, and remains the Islanders all-time leader in assists and points.

Miscellaneous Edit

Steve Yzerman, who was also renowned for his strong two-way play, considered Trottier his favorite player.[1] Both players wore uniform number 19 throughout their careers.

Currently Edit

Bryan Trottier is endorsing a clothing line called T19 (www.t19online.com). T19 helps raise funds for schools and minor sports programs.

Bryan Trottier also runs several hockey schools during the summer including one in Acton, Ontario, Midland, Ontario, and Milton, Ontario.


Coaching statisticsEdit

Regular Season
Season Team League W L OT/T
2002-03 New York Rangers NHL 21 26 7

Career statistics

Regular Season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1972-73 Swift Current Broncos WCJHL 67 16 29 45 10 -- -- -- -- --
1973-74 Swift Current Broncos WCJHL 68 41 71 112 76 13 7 8 15 8
1974-75 Lethbridge Broncos WCJHL 67 46 98 144 103 6 2 5 7 14
1975-76 New York Islanders NHL 80 32 63 95 21 13 1 7 8 8
1976-77 New York Islanders NHL 76 30 42 72 34 12 2 8 10 2
1977-78 New York Islanders NHL 77 46 77 123 46 7 0 3 3 4
1978-79 New York Islanders NHL 76 47 87 134 50 10 2 4 6 13
1979-80 New York Islanders NHL 78 42 62 104 68 21 12 17 29 16
1980-81 New York Islanders NHL 73 31 72 103 74 18 11 18 29 34
1981-82 New York Islanders NHL 80 50 79 129 88 19 6 23 29 40
1982-83 New York Islanders NHL 80 34 55 89 68 17 8 12 20 18
1983-84 New York Islanders NHL 68 40 71 111 59 21 8 6 14 49
1984-85 New York Islanders NHL 68 28 31 59 47 10 4 2 6 8
1985-86 New York Islanders NHL 78 37 59 96 72 3 1 1 2 2
1986-87 New York Islanders NHL 80 23 64 87 50 14 8 5 13 12
1987-88 New York Islanders NHL 77 30 52 82 48 6 0 0 0 10
1988-89 New York Islanders NHL 73 17 28 45 44 -- -- -- -- --
1989-90 New York Islanders NHL 59 13 11 24 29 4 1 0 1 4
1990-91 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 52 9 19 28 24 23 3 4 7 49
1991-92 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 63 11 18 29 54 21 4 3 7 8
1993-94 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 41 4 11 15 36 2 0 0 0 0
WCJHL Totals 202 103 198 301 189 19 9 13 22 22
NHL Totals 1279 524 901 1425 912 221 71 113 184 277

AchievementsEdit

  • 1975- WCJHL All-Star Team
  • 1976- Calder Memorial Trophy
  • 1976- Played in NHL All-Star Game
  • 1978- NHL First All-Star Team
  • 1978- Played in NHL All-Star Game
  • 1979- NHL First All-Star Team
  • 1979- NHL Plus/Minus Leader (Highest in NHL History)
  • 1979- Art Ross Trophy
  • 1979- Hart Trophy
  • 1980- Conn Smythe Trophy
  • 1980- Played in NHL All-Star Game
  • 1982- NHL Second All-Star Team
  • 1982- Played in NHL All-Star Game
  • 1983- Played in NHL All-Star Game
  • 1984- NHL Second All-Star Team
  • 1985- Played in NHL All-Star Game
  • 1986- Played in NHL All-Star Game
  • 1988- Bud Man of the Year Award
  • 1989- King Clancy Memorial Trophy
  • 1992- Played in NHL All-Star Game
  • 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1991, 1992, 2001(as a coach) Stanley Cup Winner
  • In 1998, he was ranked number 30 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players.


FootnotesEdit

  1. Legends of Hockey -- The Legends -- Honoured Player -- Trottier, Bryan. Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum. The Learning Edge Corporation (2001-2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-15.
  2. Bryan Trottier - Biography. Internet Movie Database Inc. (1990-2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-15.
  3. Legends of Hockey - Induction Showcase - Mario Lemieux. Bryan John Trottier, Player Category , Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum. The Learning Edge Corporation (2001-2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-15.
New York Rangers Head Coaches
Patrick • Boucher • L. Patrick • Colville • Cook • M. Patrick • Watson • Pike • Harvey • M. Patrick • Sullivan • Francis • Geoffrion • Francis • Popein • Francis • Stewart • Ferguson • Talbot • Shero • C. Patrick • Brooks • C. Patrick • Sator • Webster • Esposito • Bergeron • Esposito • Neilson • Smith • Keenan • Campbell • Muckler • Tortorella • Low • Trottier • Sather • Renney

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