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Brad May

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Brad May
Bradmay
Position Left wing
Shot Left
Nickname(s) May Day, Mayzie
Height
Weight
6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
213 lb (97 kg)
Teams Buffalo Sabres
Vancouver Canucks
Phoenix Coyotes
Colorado Avalanche
Anaheim Ducks
Toronto Maple Leafs
Detroit Red Wings
Born November 29 1971 (1971-11-29) (age 45),
Toronto, ON, CAN
NHL Draft 14th overall, 1990
Buffalo Sabres
Pro Career 1991 – 2010
Website BradMay.ca

Brad S. May (born November 29, 1971) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey left winger who played in the National Hockey League (NHL). He grew up in Stouffville, Ontario, but played his rep minor hockey in Markham, Ontario. A veteran of over 1,000 NHL games, May was known more for his enforcing skills than his scoring touch. May was also noted as being a solid leader in the Dressing room and in the 2006–07 season he won the Stanley Cup with the Anaheim Ducks.

Playing careerEdit

Brad May was drafted by the Buffalo Sabres, 14th overall, in the first round of the 1990 NHL Entry Draft. May is famous for scoring a series clinching goal in the 1993 Adams Division semi-finals against the Boston Bruins in game four by deking-out Boston defenseman Ray Bourque, which is when broadcaster Rick Jeanneret made the famous "May Day!" call.[1]

May was traded by the Sabres to the Vancouver Canucks for forward Geoff Sanderson on February 5, 1998.[2]

After sitting out during the 2004–05 NHL Lockout, May signed with the Colorado Avalanche as an unrestricted free agent for two years on August 20, 2005. May's signing caused much conjecture and debate in Colorado due to his role played in the previous season's Todd Bertuzzi and Steve Moore incident as a Vancouver Canuck.[3] He was later traded on February 27, 2007 to the Anaheim Ducks for goaltender Michael Wall.[4] The Ducks went on to win the Stanley Cup that year, and May had his name engraved on the Cup for the first time in his career.

On July 4, 2007, May re-signed as a free agent with Anaheim for a further two years.[5] In the 2007–08 season, May played his 900th career NHL game on November 16, 2007 and scoring his 125th career goal as the Ducks beat the Los Angeles Kings 6-3.[6] May was selected during the year to ride on Anaheim city's float at the 2008 Rose Bowl Parade to accompany and parade the Stanley Cup.[7]

During the 2008–09 season on January 7, 2009, May was traded from the Ducks to the Toronto Maple Leafs in exchange for a conditional 6th round draft pick in 2010.[8] On April 8, 2009 May played in his 1,000th career NHL game against the Buffalo Sabres.[9] It was no coincidence that the milestone came against the Buffalo Sabres, as he was purposely sat out for the previous game.[10]

On September 23, 2009, May was invited to try out for the Detroit Red Wings, reuniting temporarily with former Vancouver teammates Todd Bertuzzi and Dan Cloutier. May made his Red Wings debut in a pre-season game on September 25, 2009.[11] At the start of the 2009–10 season on October 8, 2009, May then signed a one-year contract with the Red Wings.[12] After posting 2 assists in 40 games with Red Wings May was put on waiver to clear roster room for Andreas Lilja on February 12, 2010.[13] After clearing waivers and briefly contemplating possible retirement[14] May decided to report to Wings AHL affiliate, the Grand Rapids Griffins, to play out the season.[15] In an expanded role with the Griffins May scored 10 points in 17 games before he was returned to Detroit as a part of the extended squad for the playoffs.[16]

On September 20, 2010, without an offer of a new contract, May effectively announced his retirement in accepting a position as a CBC American Hockey League analyst.[17]

IncidentsEdit

Phoenix CoyotesEdit

As a member of the Phoenix Coyotes in November 2000, May was suspended for 20 games for slashing Columbus Blue Jackets forward Steve Heinze in the nose with his stick. Heinze would need nine stitches, but returned to ice quickly. After the game, May apologized to Heinze, who accepted the apology. At the time, the 20-game suspension was the fourth longest in NHL history.[18]

In 2002, May was arrested after assaulting a police officer and disorderly conduct at a nightclub in Scottsdale, Arizona. He was consequently sued by the police officer and in December 2005, was ordered to pay damages from a civil jury.[19]

Steve MooreEdit

May was also noted for allegedly putting the bounty on the head of the Colorado Avalanche's Steve Moore that ultimately resulted in the Todd Bertuzzi incident that essentially ended Moore's career.[20] May was named in a lawsuit filed by Moore, but unable to prove conspiracy theories, charges were later dropped in Colorado as the case was moved to a Canadian court.[21][22]

Kim JohnssonEdit

May was suspended for three games in the 2007 Stanley Cup Playoffs for punching Minnesota Wild defenceman Kim Johnsson in the face during the final minutes of Game Four between the Ducks and Wild.[23] Both teams were involved in a large scrum of fighting, pushing, and shoving. May turned around and without warning punched Johnsson, who was skating towards the scrum. Johnsson was knocked unconscious for a short amount of time. Johnsson was not seriously injured, but was hospitalized, and missed Game Five of the series. The Ducks would win that game and eliminate the Wild from the Playoffs. In an interview, May said that he intended to contact Johnsson to apologize and explain what happened.[24]

Career statisticsEdit

Regular season and playoffsEdit

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1988–89 Niagara Falls Thunder OHL 65 8 14 22 304 17 0 1 1 55
1989–90 Niagara Falls Thunder OHL 61 33 58 91 223 16 9 13 22 64
1990–91 Niagara Falls Thunder OHL 34 37 32 69 93 14 11 14 25 53
1991–92 Buffalo Sabres NHL 69 11 6 17 309 7 1 4 5 2
1992–93 Buffalo Sabres NHL 82 13 13 26 242 8 1 1 2 14
1993–94 Buffalo Sabres NHL 84 18 27 45 171 7 0 2 2 9
1994–95 Buffalo Sabres NHL 33 3 3 6 87 4 0 0 0 2
1995–96 Buffalo Sabres NHL 79 15 29 44 295
1996–97 Buffalo Sabres NHL 42 3 4 7 106 10 1 1 2 32
1997–98 Buffalo Sabres NHL 36 4 7 11 113
1997–98 Vancouver Canucks NHL 27 9 3 12 41
1998–99 Vancouver Canucks NHL 66 6 11 17 102
1999–00 Vancouver Canucks NHL 59 9 7 16 90
2000–01 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 62 11 14 25 107
2001–02 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 72 10 12 22 95 5 0 0 0 0
2002–03 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 20 3 4 7 32
2002–03 Vancouver Canucks NHL 3 0 0 0 10 14 0 0 0 15
2003–04 Vancouver Canucks NHL 70 5 6 11 137 6 1 0 1 6
2005–06 Colorado Avalanche NHL 54 3 3 6 82 3 0 0 0 0
2006–07 Colorado Avalanche NHL 10 0 3 3 8
2006–07 Anaheim Ducks NHL 14 0 1 1 13 18 0 1 1 28
2007–08 Anaheim Ducks NHL 61 3 1 4 53 6 0 0 0 4
2008–09 Anaheim Ducks NHL 20 0 5 5 28
2008–09 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 38 1 1 2 61
2009–10 Detroit Red Wings NHL 40 0 2 2 66
2009–10 Grand Rapids Griffins AHL 17 5 5 10 40
NHL totals 1041 127 162 289 2248 88 4 9 13 112
Medal record
Competitor for Flag of Canada Canada
Ice hockey
World Championships
Silver 1996 Vienna
World Junior Championships
Gold 1991 Saskatchewan

InternationalEdit

Year Team Comp GP G A Pts PIM
1991 Canada WJC 7 1 0 1 2
1996 Canada WC 8 0 0 0 6
Junior int'l totals 7 1 0 1 2
Senior int'l totals 8 0 0 0 6

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Voices:Rick Jeanneret Preview. NHL Network (2009-04-05). Retrieved on 2009-04-05.
  2. Sabres history of trades. SabreSfans.com (2010-07-20). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  3. May wants to make new start with Avs. ESPN (2005-09-15). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  4. Avs gets youngster Wall, give up veteran May in trade. ESPN (2007-02-27). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  5. Ducks sign Veteran forward May to two-year, $1.2M deal. ESPN (2007-07-04). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  6. Ducks take down kings for second time in three nights. CBS Sports (2007-11-16). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  7. May and Stanley Cup appear at Rose parade. Anaheim Ducks (2008-01-01). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  8. Leafs acquire Brad May from Ducks. Toronto Maple Leafs (2009-01-07). Retrieved on 2009-01-10.
  9. Maple Leafs' Brad May reaches milestone 1000th game NHL game. thehockeywriters.com (2009-04-09). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  10. Toronto's May fired up for 1,000th game. Sudbury Star (2009-04-07). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  11. Tough-guy May to be in lineup tonight for tryout. Detroit Free Press (2009-09-25). Retrieved on 2009-09-25.
  12. Red Wings sign Brad May. Detroit Red Wings (2009-10-08). Retrieved on 2009-10-09.
  13. Red Wings place Brad May on waivers. National Hockey League (2010-02-12). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  14. With possible retirement looming, Griffins await Brad May's decision on future. mlive.com (2010-02-17). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  15. Brad May will join Griffins; Red Wings want enforcer to finish season in AHL. mlive.com (2010-02-24). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  16. Wings Justin Abdelkader and Brad May will return for playoffs. inspin.com (2010-04-09). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  17. CBC Sports hires Brad May as AHL analyst. CBC Sports (2010-09-20). Retrieved on 2010-09-20.
  18. Coyotes' May Suspended 20 Games, Brad May Suspended By NHL For 20 Games. CBS News (2000-11-17). Retrieved on 2007-08-08.
  19. Colorado's May ordered to pay $26K for punching cop. ESPN (2005-12-17). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  20. Report:Moore's lawyer deemed settlement offer 'insulting'. ESPN (2007-11-06). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  21. Go North: Judge tosses Moore's suit against Bertuzzi. ESPN (2005-10-13). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  22. Making May-Hem. Vancouver Sun (2007-05-16). Retrieved on 2010-07-20.
  23. Questionable punch has team fighting mad. Minnesota Star Tribune (2007-04-18). Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  24. Russo’s rants » Blog Archive » Pictures of May/Johnsson incident, White doubtful, Brad May transcript. Minnesota Star Tribune (2007-04-19). Retrieved on 2007-05-01.

External linksEdit

Preceded by
Kevin Haller
Buffalo Sabres first round draft pick
1990
Succeeded by
Philippe Boucher


This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Brad May. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Ice Hockey Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0 (Unported) (CC-BY-SA).


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