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Bob Wilson (hockey announcer)

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Bob Wilson (born Robert Henry Castellon, 1929, Arlington, Massachusetts) is a retired American radio personality who served as the longtime voice of the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League. In 1987, Wilson was honoured with the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award, enshrining him in the broadcasters' wing of the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. Wilson's booming baritone voice and his ability to articulate for radio listeners the dynamic flow and possession changes of ice hockey distinguished him from his peers. He also was noted for his detailed descriptions of hockey fights, which pleased his fans but sometimes gained him disapproval from critics.[who?]

Wilson worked at various radio stations in the Boston area before becoming a staff announcer at WHDH-AM 850 (now WEEI), where he worked as the analyst on Bruins' games and was the weekend sports anchor on the then WHDH-TV Channel 5, the city's CBS affiliate.

In 1967 he succeeded Canadian Jim Lang as the radio voice of the Bruins, his promotion coinciding with the team's rise to a Stanley Cup contender, led by Bobby Orr and Phil Esposito. However, when the Bruins departed WHDH for WBZ-AM 1030 in 1969, Wilson was put out of a job. He left Boston and joined the sports staff of St. Louis radio powerhouse KMOX, and missed Boston's 1970 Stanley Cup triumph.

In the summer of 1971, he returned to Boston when WBZ restored him to the radio play-by-play post after Boston hockey broadcasting legend Fred Cusick switched from radio to WSBK-TV and the Bruins' TV network. In Wilson's first year back at the Bruins' microphone, he called Boston's 1972 Cup win—the team's most recent. He then continued as the team's voice through 1994, retiring during the lockout of the players during a labor dispute. He has since been heard part-time hosting a music program on a station in New Hampshire, where he had become a longtime resident.

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