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Bob Miller (sports announcer)

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Robert James "Bob" Miller (born October 12, 1938 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American sportscaster, best known as the play-by-play announcer for the Los Angeles Kings team of the National Hockey League on Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket. Miller has held that post with the team since 1973 and has been partnered with Jim Fox for the last seventeen seasons.

Miller received his degree in communication studies from the University of Iowa. While there, he began his broadcasting career, covering the school's football and basketball games.[1]

After his graduation in 1960, Miller began working in television sports journalism in Wisconsin. He later would add announcing duties for the football and hockey teams at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.[2]

In 1972, Jiggs McDonald, the Kings' original play-by-play announcer, left the team to join the expansion Atlanta Flames. Kings owner Jack Kent Cooke, who was also the owner of the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team, put Lakers' announcer Francis "Chick" Hearn in charge of the search for McDonald's replacement. Miller sent tapes to Hearn and earned Hearn's recommendation for the position. However, Cooke decided to hire long-time San Francisco Bay Area announcer Roy Storey.[3]

When Storey left the team after one season, the Kings turned their attention back to Miller, who was then hired in 1973 and has been their play-by-play announcer since.[4] He has performed voice over and on-camera work for television shows and movies in scenes which included a hockey announcer. Among his credits are an episode of Cheers and the films Rollerball, Miracle on Ice, and The Mighty Ducks. Nationally, he has worked for ESPN and FOX. He also called some games for FX during the 1996 World Cup of Hockey.

Miller was inducted into the broadcaster's wing of the Hockey Hall of Fame as the 2000 recipient of the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award,[5] into the Los Angeles Kings Hall of Fame,[6] into the Wisconsin Hockey Hall of Fame and into the Southern California Sports Broadcasters Hall of Fame.[7] The press box at Staples Center, the Kings' home arena, is named in his honor.

He received the 2,319th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on October 2, 2006. At the ceremony he noted, "My greatest fear is that I retire and the Kings win a Stanley Cup the next year."[4]

Miller's broadcast partners have included Dan Avey, Rich Marotta, current Kings radio voice Nick Nickson and Pete Weber, the voice of the Nashville Predators. Miller's current broadcast partner is former Los Angeles Kings player Jim Fox.[8]

Miller's first book, Tales From the Los Angeles Kings, was published in October 2006.

Miller is married, and he and his wife Judy have two children.[2]

Notes Edit

  1. Gase, Thomas. "King of the booth", The Acorn, 2007-07-19. Retrieved on 2010-02-25. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Stewart, Larry. "From Cooke to the 'Mainstay' of the Kings (page 1)", Los Angeles Times, 1998-01-31. Retrieved on 2010-02-25. 
  3. Elliott, Helene. "Voice of the Kings Gets Royal Treatment at Last; Hockey: Bob Miller receives media honor in Hall of Fame after years of being overshadowed in L.A.", Los Angeles Times, 2000-11-14. Retrieved on 2010-06-28. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 Stewart, Larry. "Miller Is Star of This Show", Los Angeles Times, 2006-10-03. Retrieved on 2010-02-25. 
  5. Legends of Hockey - The Legends Search Splash page
  6. Stewart, Larry. "From Cooke to the 'Mainstay' of the Kings (page 2)", Los Angeles Times, 1998-01-31. Retrieved on 2010-02-25. 
  7. Stewart, Larry. "Scully Receives Two Awards", Los Angeles Times, 2002-02-05. Retrieved on 2010-02-25. 
  8. Elliott, Helene. "Voice of the Kings Gets Royal Treatment at Last", Los Angeles Times, 2000-11-14. Retrieved on 2010-02-25. 

See alsoEdit

Preceded by
Richard Garneau
Foster Hewitt Memorial Award winner
2000
Succeeded by
Mike Lange

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