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Adam Oates

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Adam Oates
Adamoates
Position Centre
Shot Right
Height
Weight
5 ft 11 in (1.8 m)
190 lb (86 kg)
Teams Detroit Red Wings (19851989)
St. Louis Blues (19891992)
Boston Bruins (19921997)
Washington Capitals (19972002)
Philadelphia Flyers (2002)
Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (2002–2003)
Edmonton Oilers (2003–2004)
Nationality Flag of Canada.svg Canada
Born August 27 1962 (1962-08-27) (age 52),
Toronto, ON, CAN
Pro Career 1985 – 2004

Adam Oates (born August 27, 1962) is a retired professional player.

Playing careerEdit

Oates' break came when Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute offered him a scholarship. He played for the college from 1982 to 1985, where he majored in management and was a contributor to RPI's 1985 NCAA Division I championship. Oates eventually graduated with a Management degree from RPI in 1991. As of the end of the 2004–05 season, Oates still held school records for most assists in a season (60, 1984–85), most points in a season (91, 1984–85), and most career points (150). He is third on the school's all-time list for most assists per game (1.53) and tied for third all-time in career points (216).

After Rensselaer's NCAA championship season, Oates signed as an undrafted free agent with the Detroit Red Wings, with the richest rookie contract up to this time at $1 million over four years. Although the team's second [[Centre] behind Steve Yzerman, Oates solidified his reputation as an elite NHL playmaker with the Red Wings, and by his last season with the club 1988–89 he was scoring at an almost assist-per-game pace. However, he was traded to the St. Louis Blues after the season along with Paul MacLean for Bernie Federko and Tony McKegney.

Oates prospered in St. Louis, where he teamed up with Brett Hull and became part of the "Hull n Oates" tandem, a reference to the musical duo of Hall & Oates. Due in no small part to the excellent playmaking of Oates, Hull had three consecutive seasons with at least 70 goals, including the 1990–91 season when Hull scored 86 (a record for right wingers) and won the Hart Trophy. Oates also had a spectacular season, as he had 90 assists and 115 points in only 61 games, earning him an NHL Second Team All-Star. However, as Oates was paid far lower than his market worth, he held out for much of the next season until he was traded to the Boston Bruins in return for Craig Janney and Stéphane Quintal.

Oates had perhaps his best seasons yet in 1992–93, as he scored a career-high 45 goals, 97 assists and 142 points to finish third overall in regular season scoring behind Mario Lemieux and Pat LaFontaine. Oates' 97 assists were more formidable than his totals in his St. Louis years, considering that he did not have a bona-fide sniper playing alongside him the whole season, as Bruins sniper Cam Neely was injured for all but 13 games during the season. The next season, Oates again finished third with 32 goals, 80 assists, and 112 points, behind Wayne Gretzky and Sergei Fedorov.

Oates played with Boston until the 1996–97 NHL season, when he was traded on March 1, 1997 to the Washington Capitals with Bill Ranford and Rick Tocchet for Jim Carey, Anson Carter, Jason Allison and Washington's 3rd round choice (Lee Goren) in the 1997 Entry Draft, in a blockbuster move near the trading deadline. As a Capital, he changed his jersey number to 77 (which he would wear for the remainder of his career), as a homage to his former Boston Bruins teammate and friend, Ray Bourque. Oates helped lead the Capitals to the Stanley Cup Finals the next season, but failed to win as the Capitals lost to the Red Wings, Oates' first NHL team. Oates had a few more productive seasons with the Caps, leading the league in assists in 2000–01 and 2001–02, both feats were done in the two seasons leading up to his fortieth birthday which also made him the oldest player to do so. On January 14, 2002, Oates became only the eighth player in NHL history to earn at least 1,000 career assists, a tribute to his playmaking skills.

In 2002–03, Oates made his second trip to the Stanley Cup Finals, this time with the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, but again his team was beat out, this time in seven games by the New Jersey Devils. His career looked to be over after the season, but on November 17, 2003, the Edmonton Oilers desperately needed a center, and signed Oates to a contract. However, the season was a disappointment as he scored only 2 goals and 18 points in 60 games, although the Oilers stayed in the playoff hunt until the end of the season. Oates announced his retirement on April 3, 2004 after his team was narrowly eliminated from the postseason

LegacyEdit

Oates is considered one of the more creative and effective playmakers in the modern NHL era, as he had more assists than any other player during the 1990s except for Gretzky. Brett Hull and Oates united to form a high-scoring tandem for three years, with Oates supplying the playmaking for Hull, who was a natural sniper. During those three years, Hull's goal totals were 72–86–70. Outside of the three seasons, when Hull was not centered by Oates, he never surmounted the 60 goal mark.

Despite his skillful playmaking, strong face-off win percentage, and impressive scoring statistics, Oates never won the Stanley Cup in his career. He was also well known as a clean player, being a six time finalist for the Lady Byng Trophy but losing to Wayne Gretzky, Pierre Turgeon, Ron Francis, and Joe Sakic. He finished third in regular season scoring three times (1990–1991, 1992–1993, and 1993–1994), but only made the postseason All-Star Second Team in 1991. The other two seasons near the top, Oates narrowly missed out because players that finished ahead of him in the scoring place also played centre. Oates's lack of such honours meant that he was often overlooked compared to his peers. Considering the 1992-93 and 1993-94 seasons combined, Oates scored the most points, with Doug Gilmour coming in second.

Oates was considered by many hockey experts to be a favorite for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2007 and 2008, which were his first two years of eligibility. He was Evantually inducted in 2012.

AwardsEdit

  • ECAC Second All-Star Team (1984)
  • NCAA East First All-American Team (1984, 1985)
  • ECAC First All-Star Team (1985)
  • NCAA Championship All-Tournament Team (1985)
  • NHL Second All-Star Team (1991)
  • Played in NHL All-Star Game (1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1997)

RecordsEdit

  • Oldest player to lead the NHL in assists in a single season (64 in 2001–02, at the age of 39)
  • He is the player who has accumulated the most career playoffs points without winning the Stanley Cup,

Career statisticsEdit

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1982–83 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute NCAA 22 9 33 42 8
1983–84 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute NCAA 38 26 57 83 15
1984–85 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute NCAA 38 31 60 91 29
1985–86 Adirondack Red Wings AHL 34 18 28 46 4 17 7 14 21 4
1985–86 Detroit Red Wings NHL 38 9 11 20 10
1986–87 Detroit Red Wings NHL 76 15 32 47 21 16 4 7 11 6
1987–88 Detroit Red Wings NHL 63 14 40 54 20 16 8 12 20 6
1988–89 Detroit Red Wings NHL 69 16 62 78 14 6 0 8 8 2
1989–90 St. Louis Blues NHL 80 23 79 102 30 12 2 12 14 4
1990–91 St. Louis Blues NHL 61 25 90 115 29 13 7 13 20 10
1991–92 St. Louis Blues NHL 54 10 59 69 12
1991–92 Boston Bruins NHL 26 10 20 30 10 15 5 14 19 4
1992–93 Boston Bruins NHL 84 45 97 142 32 4 0 9 9 4
1993–94 Boston Bruins NHL 77 32 80 112 45 13 3 9 12 8
1994–95 Boston Bruins NHL 48 12 41 53 8 5 1 0 1 2
1995–96 Boston Bruins NHL 70 25 67 92 18 5 2 5 7 2
1996–97 Boston Bruins NHL 63 18 52 70 10
1996–97 Washington Capitals NHL 17 4 8 12 4
1997–98 Washington Capitals NHL 82 18 58 76 36 21 6 11 17 8
1998–99 Washington Capitals NHL 59 12 42 54 22
1999–00 Washington Capitals NHL 82 15 56 71 14 5 0 3 3 4
2000–01 Washington Capitals NHL 81 13 69 82 28 6 0 0 0 0
2001–02 Washington Capitals NHL 66 11 57 68 22
2001–02 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 14 3 7 10 6 5 0 2 2 0
2002–03 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 67 9 36 45 16 21 4 9 13 6
2003–04 Edmonton Oilers NHL 60 2 16 18 8
NHL totals 1337 341 1079 1420 415 163 42 114 156 66


ReferencesEdit

Preceded by
Dale Hunter
Washington Capitals captains
1999-2001
Succeeded by
Steve Konowalchuk
Brendan Witt
This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Adam Oates. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Ice Hockey Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0 (Unported) (CC-BY-SA).


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