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1994–95 Vancouver Canucks season

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1994–95 Vancouver Canucks · NHL
Division 2nd Pacific
Conference 6th Western
1994–95 record 18–18–12
Home record 10–8–6
Road record 8–10–6
Goals for 153
Goals against 148
General Manager Pat Quinn
Coach Rick Ley
Captain Trevor Linden
Alternate captains Pavel Bure
Dana Murzyn
Sergio Momesso
Arena Pacific Coliseum
Average attendance 13,932
Team leaders
Goals Pavel Bure (20)
Assists Pavel Bure (23)
Points Pavel Bure (43)
Penalties in minutes Dana Murzyn (129)
Wins Kirk McLean (18)
Goals against average Kirk McLean (2.75)

The 1994–95 Vancouver Canucks season was the Canucks' 25th NHL season. Goaltender Kirk McLean accounted for all of the Canucks' 18 wins. Pavel Bure did not have the same power he did in 1992-93 and 1993-94, the two seasons in which he reached the 60-goal mark, but he still led the club in 1994-95 in goals (20) and shots (198). A trade with the Dallas Stars on April 7, 1995 saw the Russ Courtnall join his brother Geoff on the same team. The Canucks finished the season at .500 for 6th place in the Western Conference and led the NHL with 12 ties.

In the playoffs, Vancouver was the clear underdog against the 3rd-place St. Louis Blues, who had members from the 1994 Stanley-Cup champion Ranger team and former Rangers head coach Mike Keenan. After losing game 1 at the Kiel Center by a score of 2-1, the Canucks won game 2 by a score of 5-3 behind Kirk McLean's 33-save performance and Pavel Bure's shorthanded insurance goal in the third period. The shots on goal were 26 for Vancouver and 36 for St. Louis, as they had been in game 1. The Canucks carried over their momentum from their win in game 2 to the Pacific Coliseum for game 3, which they won 6-1. Sergio Momesso scored twice. The Canucks were looking to win game 4 as well, leading 2-1 after Russ Courtnall's shorthanded goal ot 4:41 of the second period. But the Blues got their jump from Brendan Shanahan who scored a natural hat trick to give the Blues a 4-2 lead. Glenn Anderson would add another goal at 13:01 of the third period as St. Louis went on to win 5-2 to square the series at 2 games apiece. In game 5 at the Kiel Center, the Canucks scored 4 times on their first 19 shots, as Curtis Joseph would be pulled in favor of Jon Casey. Trailing Vancouver 5-4 with under 12 minutes to play, Murray Baron tied the game at 8:22 of the third period. The game would go into overtime where Cliff Ronning scored at 1:48 of the first overtime period to give the Canucks a 3-2 lead in the series. Looking to close out the series at home in game 6, the Canucks were dominated by the Blues who won by a score of 8-2. Esa Tikkanen picked up 4 points in the game (2 goals, 2 assists). Kirk McLean allowed 6 goals on just 17 shots. With the series tied at 3-3, a crucial game 7 in St. Louis took place on Friday, May 19. Although the Blues had twice as many shots as the Canucks (44-22), Curtis Joseph allowed 4 goals on 21 shots while Kirk McLean made 41 saves. Pavel Bure added an empty-net goal with 22 seconds remaining to seal the game 5-3 and give the Canucks a 4-3 series win. It was Bure's 7th goal of the playoffs. It was a highly offensive series, as each team scored 27 goals over the 7 games. The Canucks' soecial teams dominated throughout, as Vancouver scored 11 power-play goals and 6 shorthanded goals in the series.

In the second round, the Canucks faced the Chicago Blackhawks. Both teams skated to a 1-1 tie before Joe Murphy scored the winner at 9:04 of the first overtime period. Blackhawks goaltender Ed Belfour stopped 26 of 27 Vancouver shots. Game 2 was also close, as Chicago edged Vancouver 2-0 on goals by Jim Cummins and Patrick Poulin. Down 2 games to none in the series, the Canucks battled desperately to get a win at home in game 3 but relinquished leads of 1-0 and 2-1. Ironically it was ex-Canuck Murray Craven who tied the game at 2-2 with 45 seconds remaining in the third period to send the game to overtime. Chris Chelios scored at 6:22 of the first overtime period as the Hawks took a commanding 3 games to none series lead. In game 4, Vancouver broke a 1-1 tie on two goals by Roman Oksiuta to lead 3-1 in the second period, but Chicago came back again on goals by Gerald Diduck and Jeremy Roenick, and so the score after 60 minutes was 3-3. Once again, the overtime hero was Chris Chelios who scored 5:35 into the extra frame to give the Blackhawks a 4-0 sweep over the Canucks and advance to the third round for the first time in three years.

Regular seasonEdit

Pacific Division
No. CR GP W L T GF GA Pts
12 Calgary Flames 48 24 17 7 163 135 55
26 Vancouver Canucks 48 18 18 12 153 148 48
38 San Jose Sharks 48 19 25 4 129 161 42
49 Los Angeles Kings 48 16 23 9 142 174 41
511 Edmonton Oilers 48 17 27 4 136 183 38
612 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim 48 16 27 5 125 164 37

Note: No. = Division rank, CR = Conference rank, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, GF = Goals For, GA = Goals Against, Pts = Points
       Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold.

Game logEdit

No. R Date Score Opponent Record
1TJanuary 20, 19951–1 OT Dallas Stars (1994–95) 0–0–1
2LJanuary 21, 19951–7 St. Louis Blues (1994–95) 0–1–1
3LJanuary 24, 19953–6 @ Detroit Red Wings (1994–95) 0–2–1
4LJanuary 25, 19952–6 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1994–95) 0–3–1
5WJanuary 28, 19953–1 @ St. Louis Blues (1994–95) 1–3–1
6TFebruary 1, 19954–4 OT Toronto Maple Leafs (1994–95) 1–3–2
7LFebruary 5, 19954–9 Chicago Blackhawks (1994–95) 1–4–2
8TFebruary 7, 19954–4 OT Edmonton Oilers (1994–95) 1–4–3
9WFebruary 9, 19955–1 Winnipeg Jets (1994–95) 2–4–3
10TFebruary 11, 19951–1 OT San Jose Sharks (1994–95) 2–4–4
11LFebruary 15, 19951–3 @ San Jose Sharks (1994–95) 2–5–4
12TFebruary 17, 19952–2 OT @ Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1994–95) 2–5–5
13WFebruary 18, 19956–2 @ Los Angeles Kings (1994–95) 3–5–5
14WFebruary 20, 19958–2 Los Angeles Kings (1994–95) 4–5–5
15LFebruary 22, 19951–4 Winnipeg Jets (1994–95) 4–6–5
16TFebruary 24, 19953–3 OT @ Dallas Stars (1994–95) 4–6–6
17WFebruary 26, 19955–1 @ San Jose Sharks (1994–95) 5–6–6
18LFebruary 28, 19953–4 San Jose Sharks (1994–95) 5–7–6
19TMarch 2, 19952–2 OT @ Calgary Flames (1994–95) 5–7–7
20WMarch 4, 19955–4 @ Los Angeles Kings (1994–95) 6–7–7
21LMarch 6, 19952–5 Detroit Red Wings (1994–95) 6–8–7
22WMarch 11, 19955–3 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1994–95) 7–8–7
23WMarch 12, 19955–2 @ Edmonton Oilers (1994–95) 8–8–7
24TMarch 14, 19953–3 OT @ Winnipeg Jets (1994–95) 8–8–8
25LMarch 16, 19952–9 @ Chicago Blackhawks (1994–95) 8–9–8
26LMarch 17, 19951–3 @ Detroit Red Wings (1994–95) 8–10–8
27WMarch 21, 19953–1 Toronto Maple Leafs (1994–95) 9–10–8
28LMarch 23, 19951–3 Chicago Blackhawks (1994–95) 9–11–8
29LMarch 25, 19951–2 Detroit Red Wings (1994–95) 9–12–8
30LMarch 26, 19950–2 @ Calgary Flames (1994–95) 9–13–8
31WMarch 29, 19955–2 Los Angeles Kings (1994–95) 10–13–8
32WMarch 31, 19956–1 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1994–95) 11–13–8
33WApril 1, 19955–1 @ Edmonton Oilers (1994–95) 12–13–8
34TApril 4, 19952–2 OT Dallas Stars (1994–95) 12–13–9
35LApril 7, 19954–7 @ Winnipeg Jets (1994–95) 12–14–9
36WApril 8, 19954–2 @ Calgary Flames (1994–95) 13–14–9
37WApril 11, 19955–0 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1994–95) 14–14–9
38LApril 13, 19954–6 Edmonton Oilers (1994–95) 14–15–9
39WApril 15, 19953–1 @ Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1994–95) 15–15–9
40TApril 17, 19952–2 OT @ Dallas Stars (1994–95) 15–15–10
41LApril 18, 19951–4 @ St. Louis Blues (1994–95) 15–16–10
42TApril 20, 19952–2 OT Calgary Flames (1994–95) 15–16–11
43WApril 22, 19956–1 Edmonton Oilers (1994–95) 16–16–11
44LApril 25, 19953–4 OT @ Chicago Blackhawks (1994–95) 16–17–11
45LApril 26, 19952–5 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1994–95) 16–18–11
46WApril 28, 19953–1 St. Louis Blues (1994–95) 17–18–11
47WApril 30, 19956–4 Calgary Flames (1994–95) 18–18–11
48TMay 3, 19953–3 OT @ San Jose Sharks (1994–95) 18–18–12

PlayoffsEdit

Player statsEdit

Regular seasonEdit

Scoring leadersEdit

Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; +/- = Plus/Minus; PIM = Penalty Minutes

Player GP G A Pts +/- PIM

GoaltendingEdit

Note: GP = Games Played; TOI = Time On Ice (minutes); W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals Against; SO = Shutouts; Sv% = Save Percentage; GAA = Goals Against Average

PlayoffsEdit

Scoring leadersEdit

Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; +/- = Plus/Minus; PIM = Penalty Minutes

Player GP G A Pts +/- PIM

GoaltendingEdit

Note: GP = Games Played; TOI = Time On Ice (minutes); W = Wins; L = Losses; GA = Goals Against; SO = Shutouts; Sv% = Save Percentage; GAA = Goals Against Average

Player GP TOI W L GA SO Sv% GAA

Awards and recordsEdit

TransactionsEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit


This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at 1994–95 Vancouver Canucks season. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Ice Hockey Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0 (Unported) (CC-BY-SA).


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