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1992-93 NHL season

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The 1992-93 NHL season was the 76th regular season of the National Hockey League. Each player wore a patch on their jersey throughout the 1992-93 regular season and playoffs to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the Stanley Cup. Twenty-four teams played 84 games each. The Montreal Canadiens won their league-leading 24th Cup by defeating the Los Angeles Kings four games to one. As of the end of the 2014-15 season, this is the last time that a Canadian team has won the Stanley Cup.

League BusinessEdit

This season saw the startup of two new clubs, the Ottawa Senators, a revival of NHL hockey in Ottawa, Canada and the Tampa Bay Lightning in Tampa, Florida.

On February 1, 1993, Gary Bettman, became the first NHL Commissioner. Prior to this the NHL's chief executive was designated as 'President.'

Regular seasonEdit

Final standingsEdit

Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, GF = Goals For, GA = Goals Against, Pts = Points

Prince of Wales ConferenceEdit

Adams Division
Team GP W L T Pts GF GA
x - Boston Bruins 84 51 26 7 109 332 268
x - Quebec Nordiques 84 47 27 10 104 351 300
x - Montreal Canadiens 84 48 30 6 102 326 280
x - Buffalo Sabres 84 38 36 10 86 335 297
Hartford Whalers 84 26 52 6 58 284 369
Ottawa Senators 84 10 70 4 24 202 395
Patrick Division
Team GP W L T Pts GF GA
z - Pittsburgh Penguins 84 56 21 7 119 367 268
x - Washington Capitals 84 43 34 7 93 325 286
x - New York Islanders 84 40 37 7 87 335 297
x - New Jersey Devils 84 40 37 7 87 308 299
Philadelphia Flyers 84 36 37 11 83 319 319
New York Rangers 84 34 39 11 79 304 308

Clarence Campbell ConferenceEdit

Norris Division
Team GP W L T Pts GF GA
x - Chicago Blackhawks 84 47 25 12 106 279 230
x - Detroit Red Wings 84 47 28 9 103 369 280
x - Toronto Maple Leafs 84 44 29 11 99 288 241
x - St. Louis Blues 84 37 36 11 85 282 278
Minnesota North Stars 84 36 38 10 82 272 293
Tampa Bay Lightning 84 23 54 7 53 245 332
Smythe Division
Team GP W L T Pts GF GA
x - Vancouver Canucks 84 46 29 9 101 346 278
x - Calgary Flames 84 43 30 11 97 322 282
x - Los Angeles Kings 84 39 35 10 88 338 340
x - Winnipeg Jets 84 40 37 7 87 322 320
Edmonton Oilers 84 26 50 8 60 242 337
San Jose Sharks 84 11 71 2 24 218 414

Note: x = clinched playoff berth, z = won Presidents' Trophy

Scoring leadersEdit

Player Team GP G A PTS
Mario Lemieux Pittsburgh 60 69 91 160
Pat LaFontaine Buffalo 84 53 95 148
Adam Oates Boston 84 45 97 142
Steve Yzerman Detroit 84 58 79 137
Teemu Selanne Winnipeg 84 76 56 132
Pierre Turgeon NY Islanders 83 58 74 132
Alexander Mogilny Buffalo 77 76 51 127
Doug Gilmour Toronto 83 32 95 127
Luc Robitaille Los Angeles 84 63 62 125
Mark Recchi Philadelphia 84 53 70 123
Mats Sundin Quebec 80 47 67 114

Leading GoaltendersEdit

Player Team GP MIN GA SO GAA
Felix Potvin Toronto 48 2781 116 2 2.50
Ed Belfour Chicago 71 4106 177 7 2.59
Tom Barrasso Pittsburgh 63 3702 186 4 3.01
Curtis Joseph St. Louis 68 3890 196 1 3.02
Kay Whitmore Vancouver 31 1817 94 1 3.10
Dominik Hasek Buffalo 28 1429 75 0 3.15
Andy Moog Boston 55 3194 168 3 3.16
Jeff Reese Calgary 26 1311 70 1 3.20
Patrick Roy Montreal 62 3595 192 2 3.20
Daren Puppa Buffalo/Toronto 32 1785 96 2 3.23

Stanley Cup PlayoffsEdit

Hhof stanley cup

The Stanley Cup at the Hockey Hall of Fame

The 1993 Stanley Cup Playoffs started on April 18, and ended on June 9. The Presidents' Trophy-winning Pittsburgh Penguins, who had won the cup the two previous years, were the favourite to "three-peat".

BracketEdit

  Division Semifinals Division Finals Conference Finals Stanley Cup Finals
                                     
1  Boston 0  
4  Buffalo 4  
  3  Montreal 4  
  4  Buffalo 0  
2  Quebec 2
3  Montreal 4  
  A3  Montreal 4  
Prince of Wales Conference
  P3  NY Islanders 1  
1  Pittsburgh 4  
4  New Jersey 1  
  1  Pittsburgh 3
  3  NY Islanders 4  
2  Washington 2
3  NY Islanders 4  
  A3  Montreal 4
  S3  Los Angeles 1
1  Chicago 0  
4  St. Louis 4  
  3  Toronto 4
  4  St. Louis 3  
2  Detroit 3
3  Toronto 4  
  N3  Toronto 3
Clarence Campbell Conference
  S3  Los Angeles 4  
1  Vancouver 4  
4  Winnipeg 2  
  1  Vancouver 2
  3  Los Angeles 4  
2  Calgary 2
3  Los Angeles 4  

Division SemifinalsEdit

Boston vs. BuffaloEdit

Buffalo's four-game sweep of the Bruins ended with a memorable overtime goal by Brad May at Buffalo's Memorial Auditorium, leading to Sabres' play-by-play announcer Rick Jeanneret's famous "May Day! May Day! May Day!" call.

  • April 18 - Buffalo 5 Boston 4 (OT)
  • April 20 - Buffalo 4 Boston 0
  • April 22 - Boston 3 Buffalo 4 (OT)
  • April 24 - Boston 5 Buffalo 6 (OT)

Buffalo wins best-of-seven series 4-0

Quebec vs. MontrealEdit

Montreal coach Jacques Demers held himself to a promise he made to goaltender Patrick Roy earlier in the season and kept him as the starting goalie despite a couple of weak goals allowed in the first two games of the series against the Nordiques. With the Canadiens staring a potential 3-0 series deficit to the rival Nords in the face, overtime in Game 3 was marked by two disputed goals that were reviewed by the video goal judge. The first review ruled that Stephan Lebeau had knocked the puck in with a high stick, but the second upheld the Habs' winning goal, as it was directed in by the skate of Quebec defenceman Alexei Gusarov, and not that of a Montreal player.

  • April 18 - Montreal 2 Quebec 3 (OT)
  • April 20 - Montreal 1 Quebec 4
  • April 22 - Quebec 1 Montreal 2 (OT)
  • April 24 - Quebec 2 Montreal 3
  • April 26 - Montreal 5 Quebec 4 (OT)
  • April 28 - Quebec 2 Montreal 6

Montreal wins best-of-seven series 4-2

Pittsburgh vs. New JerseyEdit

The Devils had been a struggling team prior to the 1992-93 season, and in the first round of the playoffs, they met the Presidents' Trophy winners from Pittsburgh. The Penguins entered the series on an 11-game playoff winning streak, which they extended to a record 14 games in this series.

  • April 18 - New Jersey 3 Pittsburgh 6
  • April 20 - New Jersey 0 Pittsburgh 7
  • April 22 - Pittsburgh 4 New Jersey 3
  • April 25 - Pittsburgh 1 New Jersey 4
  • April 26 - New Jersey 2 Pittsburgh 5

Pittsburgh wins best-of-seven series 4-1

Washington vs. New York IslandersEdit

Game 6 of this series was marred by a vicious check on the Islanders' leading scorer, Pierre Turgeon, by the Capitals' Dale Hunter, moments after Turgeon scored a third-period goal to put the game and the series out of reach for Washington. Hunter received a 21-game suspension for the hit, which carried over into the 1993-94 season.

  • April 18 - New York Islanders 1 Washington 3
  • April 20 - New York Islanders 5 Washington 4 (2OT)
  • April 22 - Washington 3 New York Islanders 4 (OT)
  • April 24 - Washington 3 New York Islanders 4 (2OT)
  • April 26 - New York Islanders 4 Washington 6
  • April 28 - Washington 3 New York Islanders 5

NYI win best-of-seven series 4-2

Chicago vs. St. LouisEdit

The Blackhawks, on an overtime goal in Game 4, became the second division champion to be swept in the first round of the playoffs. Chicago goaltender Ed Belfour claimed he had been interfered with by St. Louis star Brett Hull on the play, but to no avail as the tally stood as the game- and series-winner. Belfour famously went on a rampage after the game, breaking a hot tub, coffee maker, and television in the visitors' locker room at the St. Louis Arena. In 1999, Hawk fans would be left to contemplate the irony of the situation when Belfour and Hull were teammates on that year's championship team, the Dallas Stars, who in 1993 were known as the Minnesota North Stars. The previous season, Chicago had won 11 straight playoff games, setting an NHL record, to reach the Stanley Cup Final. Pittsburgh, who had won seven in a row, swept the Hawks to equal the record. After being swept by the Blues, the Hawks had turned an 11-game playoff winning streak into an eight-game playoff losing streak.

  • April 18 - St. Louis 4 Chicago 3
  • April 21 - St. Louis 2 Chicago 0
  • April 23 - Chicago 0 St. Louis 3
  • April 25 - Chicago 3 St. Louis 4 (OT)

St. Louis wins best-of-seven series 4-0

Detroit vs. TorontoEdit

In a revival of the heated Original Six rivalry, Nikolai Borschevsky's Game 7 overtime goal gave Toronto the series and made them the sixth club to eliminate a team with a better regular season record in the first round of the playoffs. This was also Toronto's first win over Detroit since the Leafs beat the Wings in the full seven games back in the 1964 Stanley Cup Finals.

  • April 19 - Toronto 3 Detroit 6
  • April 21 - Toronto 2 Detroit 6
  • April 23 - Detroit 2 Toronto 4
  • April 25 - Detroit 2 Toronto 3
  • April 27 - Toronto 5 Detroit 4 (OT)
  • April 29 - Detroit 7 Toronto 3
  • May 1 - Toronto 4 Detroit 3 (OT)

Toronto wins best-of-seven series 4-3

Vancouver vs. WinnipegEdit

The Smythe Division champions from Vancouver managed to shut down the Jets in six games.

  • April 19 - Winnipeg 2 Vancouver 4
  • April 21 - Winnipeg 2 Vancouver 3
  • April 23 - Vancouver 4 Winnipeg 5
  • April 25 - Vancouver 3 Winnipeg 1
  • April 27 - Winnipeg 4 Vancouver 3 (OT)
  • April 29 - Vancouver 4 Winnipeg 3 (OT)

Vancouver wins best-of-seven series 4-2

Calgary vs. Los AngelesEdit

The Kings upset the Flames in a high-scoring six-game series.

  • April 18 - Los Angeles 6 Calgary 3
  • April 21 - Los Angeles 4 Calgary 9
  • April 23 - Calgary 5 Los Angeles 2
  • April 25 - Calgary 1 Los Angeles 3
  • April 27 - Los Angeles 9 Calgary 4
  • April 29 - Calgary 6 Los Angeles 9

Los Angeles wins best-of-seven series 4-2

Division FinalsEdit

Montreal vs. BuffaloEdit

The long-awaited series between Patrick Roy and Grant Fuhr had finally arrived. However the Canadiens swept the series, winning every game by a score of 4-3.

  • May 2 - Buffalo 3 Montreal 4
  • May 4 - Buffalo 3 Montreal 4 (OT)
  • May 6 - Montreal 4 Buffalo 3 (OT)
  • May 8 - Montreal 4 Buffalo 3 (OT)

Montreal wins best-of-seven series 4-0

Pittsburgh vs. New York IslandersEdit

The Isles' improbable upset of the Penguins was capped off by David Volek's series-winning goal at 5:16 of overtime in Game 7.

  • May 2 - New York Islanders 3 Pittsburgh 2
  • May 4 - New York Islanders 0 Pittsburgh 3
  • May 6 - Pittsburgh 3 New York Islanders 1
  • May 8 - Pittsburgh 5 New York Islanders 6
  • May 10 - New York Islanders 3 Pittsburgh 6
  • May 12 - Pittsburgh 5 New York Islanders 7
  • May 14 - New York Islanders 4 Pittsburgh 3 (OT)

New York Islanders win best-of-seven series 4-3

Toronto vs. St. LouisEdit

The Maple Leafs defeated the Blues in seven games, despite Blues' goaltender Curtis Joseph's efforts. The Blues were heavily outshot throughout the series.

  • May 3 - St. Louis 1 Toronto 2 (2OT)
  • May 5 - St. Louis 2 Toronto 1 (2OT)
  • May 7 - Toronto 3 St. Louis 4
  • May 9 - Toronto 4 St. Louis 1
  • May 11 - St. Louis 1 Toronto 5
  • May 13 - Toronto 1 St. Louis 2
  • May 15 - St. Louis 0 Toronto 6

Toronto wins best-of-seven series 4-3

Vancouver vs. Los AngelesEdit

Despite Vancouver's huge win in Game 4, Game 5 in Vancouver saw a stoppage of play as King center Gary Shuchuk got hurt and was sent into the dressing room. Many thought he was out of the playoffs, but he later came back in the game and ended up winning Game 5 in double overtime for the Kings. The Canucks couldn't recover and thus the Kings advanced to the Conference Finals.

  • May 2 - Los Angeles 2 Vancouver 5
  • May 5 - Los Angeles 6 Vancouver 3
  • May 7 - Vancouver 4 Los Angeles 7
  • May 9 - Vancouver 7 Los Angeles 2
  • May 11 - Los Angeles 4 Vancouver 3 (2OT)
  • May 13 - Vancouver 3 Los Angeles 5

Los Angeles wins best-of-seven series 4-2

Conference FinalsEdit

Montreal vs. New York IslandersEdit

All teams in the Conference Finals were seeded third in their division.

Montreal's win in game three was their eleventh straight, tying the single-playoff record set a year earlier by Pittsburgh and Chicago.

  • May 16 - New York Islanders 1 Montreal 4
  • May 18 - New York Islanders 3 Montreal 4 (2OT)
  • May 20 - Montreal 2 New York Islanders 1 (OT)
  • May 22 - Montreal 1 New York Islanders 4
  • May 24 - New York Islanders 2 Montreal 5

Montreal wins best-of-seven series 4-1

Toronto vs. Los AngelesEdit

This exciting and very heated seven-game series has long been remembered by hockey fans. The Toronto Maple Leafs iced a highly competitive team for the first time in years and broke their 26-year Stanley Cup appearance drought for the first time since 1967. The Los Angeles Kings, led by captain Wayne Gretzky, also had high ambitions.

  • May 17 - Los Angeles 1 Toronto 4
  • May 19 - Los Angeles 3 Toronto 2
  • May 21 - Toronto 2 Los Angeles 4
  • May 23 - Toronto 4 Los Angeles 2
  • May 25 - Los Angeles 2 Toronto 3 (OT)
  • May 27 - Toronto 5 Los Angeles 4 (OT)

Toronto wins best-of-seven series 4-2

FinalsEdit

Montreal vs. TorontoEdit

Date Away Score Home Score Notes
June 1 Toronto 4 Montreal 1
June 3 Toronto 2 Montreal 3 (OT)
June 5 Montreal 4 Toronto 2
June 7 Montreal 3 Toronto 2 (OT)
June 9 Toronto 5 Montreal 2
June 11 Montreal 4 Toronto 5
June 13 Toronto 1 Montreal 4

Montreal wins best-of-seven series 4-1. Patrick Roy (Montreal) wins Conn Smythe Trophy

Notable EventsEdit

  • Manon Rheaume became the first female athlete in history to play for a major sports league in North America as she tended goal for the Tampa Bay Lightning in an exhibition game on September 23, 1992 versus the St. Louis Blues,
  • Ottawa Senators reinstated and Tampa Bay Lightning added, bringing the league to 24 teams. Interesting to note is that both teams would win their opening games and sit atop their respective Divisions. Which lead to Harry Neale jokingly proclaiming before the end of Ottawa's first win that both the Senators and Lightning would reach the Finals in May.
  • October 1992: Gil Stein named NHL President,
  • February 1993: Gary Bettman named NHL Commissioner,
  • record set for most 100-point scorers and most 50-goal scorers in one season,
  • This is the first time for the Los Angeles Kings to be in the conference final, only to lose four games to two to Toronto Maple Leafs.
  • the 1993 Stanley Cup playoffs marked the 100th anniversary of the Stanley Cup,
  • The Montreal Canadiens are the last Canadian team to have won the Stanley Cup, and the last Canadian team to have had home ice advantage in the finals.

Records broken/equalledEdit

Regular seasonEdit

TeamEdit
  • Most Losses, One Season: San Jose Sharks (71)
  • Fewest Ties, One Season: San Jose Sharks (2)
  • Most Home Losses, One Season: San Jose Sharks (32)
  • Most Road Losses, One Season: Ottawa Senators (40)
  • Fewest Road Wins, One Season: Ottawa Senators (1)*
  • Longest Winning Streak: Pittsburgh Penguins (17)
  • Longest Losing Streak: San Jose Sharks (17)*
  • Longest Road Losing Streak: Ottawa Senators (38)
  • Longest Road Winless Streak: Ottawa Senators (38)
  • Most 100-or-more Point Scorers, One Season: Pittsburgh Penguins (4)
  • Fastest Three Goals from the Start of Period, One Team: Calgary Flames (0:53, February 10, 1993)
IndividualEdit
  • Most Goals, Including Playoffs: Wayne Gretzky (875)
  • Most 30-Goal Seasons: Mike Gartner (14)*
  • Most Consecutive 30-Goal Seasons: Mike Gartner (14)
  • Most Goals, One Season, by a Left Winger: Luc Robitaille (63)
  • Most Goals, One Season, by a Rookie: Teemu Selanne (76)
  • Most Assists, One Season, by a Left Winger: Joe Juneau (70)
  • Most Assists, One Season, by a Rookie: Joe Juneau (70)* (Note: Wayne Gretzky scored 86 assists in his first year, but he was not considered a rookie)
  • Most Points, One Season, by a Left Winger: Luc Robitaille (125)
  • Most Points, One Season, by a Rookie: Teemu Selanne (132) (Note: Wayne Gretzky scored 137 points in his first year, but he was not considered a rookie)
  • Most Assists, One Game, by a Goaltender: Jeff Reese (3, February 10, 1993)
  • Most Games Missed While Winning Art Ross Trophy: Mario Lemieux (24)

PlayoffsEdit

TeamEdit
  • Most Overtime Games, One Playoff Year: 28
  • Most Overtime Wins, One Playoff Year: Montreal Canadiens (10)
  • Most Consecutive Overtime Wins, One Playoff Year: Montreal Canadiens (10)
  • Most Consecutive Wins, One Playoff Year: Montreal Canadiens (11)*
IndividualEdit
  • Most Consecutive Wins, One Playoff Year: Patrick Roy (11)*
  • Most Goals by a Defenceman, One Game: Eric Desjardins (3, June 3, 1993)*
  • Most Power-Play Goals, One Game: Dino Ciccarelli (3, April 29, 1993)*
  • Most Shorthanded Goals, One Game: Tom Fitzgerald (2, May 8, 1993)*
  • Most Assists, One Period: Adam Oates (3, April 24, 1993)*

* Equalled existing record

Rule ChangesEdit

  • Schedule length changed to 84 games. Two games in each team's schedule to be played in non-NHL cities.
  • Instigating a fight results in a game misconduct penalty.
  • Substitutions disallowed for coincidental minor penalties when teams are at full strength.
  • Minor penalty for diving introduced.
  • Wearing of a helmet made optional.

Major TransactionsEdit

NHL AwardsEdit

Presidents' Trophy: Pittsburgh Penguins
Prince of Wales Trophy: Montreal Canadiens
Clarence S. Campbell Bowl: Toronto Maple Leafs
Art Ross Memorial Trophy: Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins
Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy: Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins
Calder Memorial Trophy: Teemu Selanne, Winnipeg Jets
Conn Smythe Trophy: Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens
Frank J. Selke Trophy: Doug Gilmour, Toronto Maple Leafs
Hart Memorial Trophy: Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins
Jack Adams Award: Pat Burns, Toronto Maple Leafs
James Norris Memorial Trophy: Chris Chelios, Chicago Blackhawks
King Clancy Memorial Trophy: Dave Poulin, Boston Bruins
Lady Byng Memorial Trophy: Pierre Turgeon, New York Islanders
Lester B. Pearson Award: Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins
NHL Plus/Minus Award: Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins
Vezina Trophy: Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks
William M. Jennings Trophy: Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks
Lester Patrick Trophy: Frank Boucher, Mervyn "Red" Dutton, Bruce McNall, Gil Stein

All-Star teamsEdit

First Team   Position   Second Team
Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks G Tom Barrasso, Pittsburgh Penguins
Chris Chelios, Chicago Blackhawks D Larry Murphy, Pittsburgh Penguins
Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins D Al Iafrate, Washington Capitals
Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins C Pat LaFontaine, Buffalo Sabres
Teemu Selanne, Winnipeg Jets RW Alexander Mogilny, Buffalo Sabres
Luc Robitaille, Los Angeles Kings LW Kevin Stevens, Pittsburgh Penguins

DebutsEdit

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1992-93 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):


Last gamesEdit

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1992-93 (listed with their last team):


Hat tricksEdit

Neutral Site Game AdsEdit


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


NHL seasons

1988-89 | 1989-90 | 1990-91 | 1991-92 | 1992-93 | 1993-94 | 1994-95 | 1995-96 | 1996-97

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